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Spanish Exploration: Juan Perez Expedition of 1774 -- First European Discovery and Exploration of Washington State Coast and Nueva Galicia (the Pacific Northwest)

Juan Perez (Juan Josef Perez Hernandez), sailing on the frigate Santiago with a crew made up mostly of Mexicans, was the first non-native to sight, examine, name, and record the islands near British C...

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Steamships Glenogle and City of Kingston collide in Tacoma's Commencement Bay on April 23, 1899

On April 23, 1899, two ships collide in the early morning darkness on Commencement Bay. The Glenogle is a 400-foot ocean liner bound for Asia. The City of Kingston is a 246-foot da...

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The Dalles Lock and Dam

The Dalles Lock and Dam (The Dalles Dam) is one of the 10 largest producers of hydroelectric power in the United States. Since its first generator went online in 1957, the dam has produced more than 9...

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Treaty of Neah Bay, 1855

The Treaty of Neah Bay was signed on on January 31, 1855 by Isaac Stevens (1818-1862), Governor of Washington Territory, and by leaders and delegates of the Makah tribe. Following is the complete text...

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Tugboat Annie: Seattle's First Movie

In 1933 Seattle played a part in a blockbuster movie. Tugboat Annie, the story of a long-suffering female tug skipper in the mythical community of Secoma on Puget Sound, was the hit of the day, in man...

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Turning Point 1: An Accidental Metropolis

This the first in a series of special essays commissioned by The Seattle Times to examine crucial turning points in the history of Seattle and King County. "An Accidental Metropolis" considers the gam...

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Turning Point 14: Progressivism's High Tide: Creation of the Port of Seattle in 1911

The 14th essay in our Turning Points series for The Seattle Times, written by Walt Crowley, details the creation of the Port of Seattle on September 5, 1911. The election of the first three Port Commi...

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Turning Point 9: The Sound and the Ferry: The Birth of Washington State Ferries

The ninth essay in HistoryLink's Turning Points series for The Seattle Times traces the history of ferry transportation on Puget Sound beginning with Native American canoe transportation, continuing t...

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USS Missouri

The USS Missouri (BB-63), moored at Bremerton's Puget Sound Naval Shipyard from 1954 to 1984, was the last battleship commissioned by the United States Navy and the second battleship to bear the name ...

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Valencia, SS, the Wreck of (1906)

On Monday, January 22, 1906, the coastal passenger liner SS Valencia, en route from San Francisco to Seattle with 108 passengers and 65 crew aboard, passed the entrance to the Strait of Juan de Fuca i...

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Vancouver, George (1758-1798)

George Vancouver was an important explorer of Puget Sound. He served for 25 years in the British Navy, and commanded the 1791-1792 British expedition to the North Pacific. In April 1792, George Vancou...

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Virginia V -- Last of Puget Sound's Mosquito Fleet Steamers

Before Washington's state highway system was established, water transport was essential to commerce and public transportation on Puget Sound. The hundreds of small, independent, privately owned vessel...

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Washington Public Port Districts -- Part 1

In 1911, the Washington Legislature, reacting against private railroad companies' domination of docks and harbors that were critical to the trade-dependent state's economy, authorized local voters to ...

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Washington Public Port Districts -- Part 2

Washington's publicly owned and managed port districts operate huge container shipping terminals, small-boat marinas, and rural boat launches. They run major international airports, small general avia...

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Washington Public Ports: A List with Founding Dates

This is a list of Washington Public Ports, presented in the order they were established. Washington has 75 public port districts, more than any other state. Each is an independent government body, run...

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Wawona -- Pacific Lumber and Codfishing Schooner

The schooner Wawona, launched at Fairhaven, California, in 1897, was the largest three-masted sailing schooner ever built in North America. For 17 years, the Wawona hauled lumber up and down the Pacif...

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West Coast Waterfront Strike of 1934

Along with every other major West Coast port, Seattle's harbor was paralyzed from May 9 to July 31, 1934, by one of the most important and bitter labor strikes of the twentieth century. The struggle p...

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West Point Lighthouse

The West Point Lighthouse, built in 1881 by the U. S. Lighthouse Service, marks the hazardous shoal and northern entrance into Elliott Bay. The beacon, located in Seattle's Discovery Park at the base ...

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West Seattle Memories Part 5: West Seattle Ferry

This file contains recollections of the West Seattle Ferry by West Seattle residents Carroll Mage and George Shephard. They recall the days before the West Seattle Bridge existed -- when the quickest ...

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Western Gear Corporation (Everett)

For six decades in Washington, including 25 years on the Everett waterfront, the Western Gear Corporation designed and built cutting-edge industrial products for customers around the world. Its projec...

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Westport -- The Grays Harbor County Town (around 1912) by Bernice Garner Marsters

This People's History consists of a letter written in June 1958, describing life in Westport during the years following 1912. Westport is located in Grays Harbor County on a peninsula on the Pacific c...

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Williamson, Joe D. (1909-1994)

Over the course of his lifetime, much of it spent on the water, Joe D. Williamson (1909-1994) documented a wide swath of Northwest history with his camera, yet he did not consider photography his prim...

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Willits, Earl Carmi (1889-1967) and Floyd Calvin (1892-1962)

A Willits canoe, considered one of the finest canoes ever made, was the life's work of the Willits brothers: Earl Carmi (1889-1967) and Floyd Calvin (1892-1962). Born in the Midwest, they arrived in t...

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Zodiac, Historic Schooner

Built in 1924 for the heirs to the Johnson & Johnson pharmaceuticals fortune, the two-masted schooner Zodiac has been based in Seattle since the early 1990s. She is the largest wooden sailing vess...

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