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Capitol Hill and the Movement: Dotty Decoster Remembers

This is an excerpt from a HistoryLink interview by Heather MacIntosh with Dotty DeCoster in April 2000. DeCoster was an outspoken member of the Women's Movement in the late 1960s and 1970s in Seattle....

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Capitol Hill Branch, The Seattle Public Library

The Capitol Hill Branch, The Seattle Public Library, opened at 425 Harvard Avenue E on May 31, 2003. The site was formerly home to the Susan J. Henry Branch, The Seattle Public Library. The Henry Br...

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Captain Aaron Bert, Washington National Guard, writes home from Iraq

Aaron Bert worked in the finance department of the City of Seattle until his Washington Army National Guard unit was activated for service in Iraq in 2004. In this email, he relates the death of SGT D...

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Carbonado -- Thumbnail History

Carbonado, located on the Carbon River below Mount Rainier in the Cascade foothills of eastern Pierce County, prospered for decades as an industrial coalmining town. As settlers poured into the Puget ...

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Career of a Tugboat: The Anne W.

For more than 50 years, the tugboat Anne W. worked Northwest waters, much of the time hauling barges from a gravel pit in Steilacoom to the shores of Lake Union in Seattle. Before being retired from s...

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Carlson, Edward "Eddie" E. (1911-1990)

Edward "Eddie" E. Carlson was a Seattle business executive and a tireless civic leader. He chaired the World's Fair Commission, the organizing muscle behind the 1962 Century 21 Exposition. A leader in...

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Carlton Complex Fire

The 2014 Carlton Complex fire, the largest single wildfire in Washington history, burned 256,108 acres, destroyed 353 homes, and caused an estimated $98 million in damage. The fire caused no direct fa...

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Carnation Library, King County Library System

The Carnation Library has been an important cultural center since it first began in 1924, the work of dedicated women volunteers. Located in the small town of Carnation in the Snoqualmie River Valley,...

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Carnation (Tolt) -- Thumbnail History

Carnation (previously Tolt), a rural community along the Snoqualmie River in eastern King County, was founded early in the settlement of the county. The town was named after the world-famous Carnation...

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Carr, Alice Robertson (1899-1996)

Alice Robertson Carr (later de Creeft, 1899-1996) came to the Pacific Northwest early in her life and as a young emerging sculptor is credited with two public monuments for Seattle's Woodland Park in ...

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Carroll, Charles Oliver "Chuck" (1906-2003)

During the 1950s and 1960s, Charles O. "Chuck" Carroll was, arguably, the most powerful man in Seattle and King County. As King County Prosecutor he was the effective head of all law enforcement in th...

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Carver Gayton reflects on the Jim Owens statue at Husky Stadium, University of Washington

In October 2003, a statue of former Husky head coach Jim Owens (1927-2009) was placed in front of the Husky Stadium in Seattle. The statue renewed a longstanding controversy surrounding Owens. Owens c...

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Cashmere -- Thumbnail History

The town of Cashmere in Chelan County is among the most picturesque in Washington. It lies on the southern bank of the Wenatchee River about midway between its turbulent upper reaches at Leavenworth a...

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Cathlamet -- Thumbnail History

As you approach Cathlamet by water, this small town still retains the look of a turn-of-the-century riverfront village. The only incorporated town in Wahkiakum County, this historic community rising u...

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Cathlamet in the 1930s (Marjorie Bacon Brown Remembers) by Crystal J. Ortmann

This portrait of Marjorie Bacon Brown and of Cathlamet in the 1930s was written by Crystal J. Ortmann.

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Catholicism in the Walla Walla Valley

Roman Catholics were among the earliest explorers to enter the Pacific Northwest in the eighteenth century and they were among the earliest settlers in the region in the nineteenth century. The formal...

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Cayton, Horace (1859-1940)

Horace Cayton was the African American publisher of the Seattle Republican, a newspaper directed toward both white and black readers and which at one point had the second largest circulation in the ci...

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Cayuse Indians

The Cayuse Indians were once masters of a vast homeland of more than six million acres in what is now Washington and Oregon. The first of the Northwest tribes to acquire horses, they were relatively f...

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Cedar Creek Bridge (Clark County)

The Cedar Creek Bridge, designated as Clark County's Bridge No. 65 and located at milepost 3.8 on NE Etna Road, was built in 1946, demolished in 2016, and replaced in 2017 by a new bridge. It spans Ce...

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Cedar Falls -- Thumbnail History

Cedar Falls, originally a City Light company town, is located in the upper Cedar River watershed, 30 miles southeast of Seattle. The town's history also encompasses nearby communities that housed rail...

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Cedar River Education Center -- Slideshow

This slideshow documents the opening of the Cedar River Education Center, located in eastern King County on Rattlesnake Lake, on October 2, 2001. Written and photographed by Alan Stein and sponsored b...

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Cedar River Tour

This is a Rivers in Time tour of the Cedar River, home of Seattle's watershed since 1901. Curated by Alan J. Stein. Presented by King County, Seattle Public Utilities, and Seattle City Light.

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Cedar River Watershed (King County) -- Environmental Overview

The Cedar River watershed, located in the eastern central portion of King County, Washington, is nearly 24 miles long, and roughly 10 miles wide. It has been in use as Seattle's main water supply sinc...

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Cedar-Sammamish Watershed

The Cedar-Sammamish Watershed in King County comprises 692 square miles of mountains and valleys that have been shaped by environmental forces and by generations of human activities. The watershed, in...

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