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Topic: Northwest Indians

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HistoryLink Elementary: Marcus and Narcissa Whitman -- Missionaries of the Walla Walla Valley

Marcus and Narcissa Whitman were missionaries who came to the Walla Walla Valley from New York. They wanted to teach Indians about their religion. They also wanted the Indians to change the way they w...

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HistoryLink Elementary: Marmes Rockshelter

The Marmes Rockshelter was a very important archaeological find in Washington. Tools, human bones, and a cremation hearth more than 8,000 years old were discovered there. But scientists had a big prob...

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HistoryLink Elementary: Prehistoric Tools and Weapons

Archaeological finds in various locations across Washington have helped scientists learn about how the earliest residents of this state lived. (This essay was written for students in third and fourth ...

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HistoryLink Elementary: Princess Angeline, Daughter of Chief Seattle

Kikisoblu, the daughter of Chief Seattle was a friend to early Seattle pioneers. One of the pioneer women, Catherine Maynard, thought Kikisoblu should have a name that would let everyone know that she...

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HistoryLink Elementary: Transportation on Lake Washington

For thousands of years, people who lived on Lake Washington have used its waters in their daily lives. In the last 150 years, the methods of crossing the lake to transport goods and people from one si...

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Holm, Bill (b. 1925)

Bill Holm is curator emeritus of Northwest Indian art at the Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture in Seattle, a professor emeritus of art and anthropology at the University of Washington, and o...

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Hudson's Bay Company

The Hudson's Bay Company, a fur-trading enterprise headquartered in London, began operations on the shores of Hudson Bay in 1670. During the next century and a half, it gradually expanded its network ...

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Indian Henry (So-To-Lick) (ca. 1820-1895)

There is a place on the lower southwestern slopes of Mt. Rainier that has been called one of the "loveliest alpine meadows and probably the most famous single view of the mountain" (Spring and Manning...

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James, Bill (b. 1944)

Bill James, a Lummi textile and basket weaver, environmental activist, and tribal historian, absorbed the artistic and cultural traditions of his tribe as a means to both revitalize Coast Salish weavi...

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Japanese Castaways of 1834: The Three Kichis

The first Japanese known to have visited what is now Washington arrived in a dismasted, rudderless ship that ran aground on the northernmost tip of the Olympic Peninsula sometime in January 1834. The ...

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Jones, Johnpaul (b. 1941), Architect

One of perhaps 100 Native American architects in the United States, architect Johnpaul Jones has manifested his Choctaw/Cherokee heritage in the creation of an internationally significant legacy of pr...

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Jules, Charles (Schay nam'kin) (1846-1935)

Chief Charles Jules (Schay nam'kin) was held in high regard by members of the Snohomish and related bands that would eventually become the Tulalip Tribes, as well as by his white contemporaries. Jules...

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