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Marysville -- Thumbnail History

Marysville is located in the west-central part of Snohomish County, five miles north-northeast of the county seat, Everett. Although the origin of its name has been the subject of considerable debate...

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Mashel (sometimes Maxon) Massacre, (March 1856)

The incident known as the Mashel Massacre occurred in late March 1856 on the Mashel prairie just north of the confluence of the Mashel and Nisqually rivers (present-day Pierce County). It was the last...

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Masked Robbers Trammel Train in Ballard

Romantic tales of bank heists, train robberies, and hold ups were favorites of American newspapers, large and small, in the early part of the twentieth century. Among these is a story set in Ballard, ...

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Mason, Alden (1919-2013)

One of the Northwest's most prolific and delightful painters, Alden Mason was influential in the Seattle art scene since the late 1940s, as an instructor at the University of Washington, an inventive ...

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Mason County -- Thumbnail History

Mason County encompasses the southern reach of Hood Canal and many bays and inlets of southern Puget Sound and once extended to the Pacific Ocean. After settlement, the mainstay of the economy was log...

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Mason, Dawn Taylor (b. 1945)

Democrat Dawn Mason served in the Washington State House of Representatives from 1995 to 1999, representing the 37th District encompassing much of Central and Southeast Seattle. She was assistant mino...

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Masters, Clarence William "Molly" (1897-1975): A Coal Miner's Life and His Reminiscence of World War I

Clarence Masters, known to everyone as "Molly," was a coal miner who worked in east King County mines for his whole life. As a boy he had lived with his family in Port Blakely, but was made an orphan ...

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Masters of Northwest Art -- Richard Fuller, Uncrowned King of Visual Art

Thelma Lehmann, Seattle painter and arts connoisseur, recounts her friendship with internationally respected art collector and patron Richard E. Fuller (1897-1976), and she describes his founding of t...

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Masters of Northwest Art: Guy Anderson -- Master of the Northwest Spirit

Thelma Lehmann, Seattle painter and arts connoisseur, recalls a lunch meeting with Guy Anderson (1906-1998), a Northwest painter and member of the "Northwest Mystic" School including Mark Tobey (1890-...

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Masters of Northwest Art: Kenneth Callahan -- A Creative Mix of Family and Art

Seattle painter and arts connoisseur Thelma Lehmann describes painter Kenneth Callahan (1905-1986), one of the four "Northwest Mystic" artists, and a close personal friend. This group of painters incl...

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Masters of Northwest Art: Mark Tobey -- Guru of Seattle Painters

Thelma Lehmann, Seattle painter and arts connoisseur, describes Mark Tobey (1890-1976), whom she calls the most visionary of the four "Northwest Mystic" painters. She describes him as petulant and que...

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Masters of Northwest Art: Morris Graves -- Serious Art, Insouciant Antics

Seattle painter and arts connoisseur Thelma Lehmann describes some of the surprising public antics of famed "Northwest Mystic" painter Morris Graves (1911-2001), a friend and colleague. From Graves' p...

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Mathison Park (Burien)

Mathison Park in Burien offers a snapshot of Burien's past, preserved by the Mathison family for future generations to enjoy. The park is located on a hill in an area originally known as Sunnydale, ju...

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Matthews, Reverend Mark (1867-1940)

If one person in the history of Seattle reflects the significant way in which religion infused itself into the social and political life of the city, it would be the Reverend Mark Matthews. Matthews ...

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Maxey, Carl (1924-1997)

Carl Maxey was Spokane's first prominent black attorney and an influential and controversial civil-rights leader. He was born in 1924 in Tacoma and raised as an orphan in Spokane. He overcame an almos...

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Maxie, Peggy (b. 1936)

Peggy Joan Maxie was the first African American woman to be elected to the Washington State House of Representatives. As a Representative from the 37th District in Seattle she served for six consecuti...

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Maxwell, Ora (1871-1932)

Ora L. Maxwell was a Spokane librarian who in 1915 founded the Spokane Walking Club, which would eventually evolve into the Spokane Mountaineers, one of the most important outdoors and environmental o...

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May 17, 1858: The Ordeal of the Steptoe Command

Randall A. Johnson (1915-2007) served as Sheriff of Spokane Corral of The Westerners, the group that published The Pacific Northwesterner quarterly magazine for many years. Johnson born in LaCrosse, W...

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May, Catherine Dean Barnes (Bedell) (1914-2004)

Catherine May was the first woman elected to Congress from Washington state and one of the few women of her generation to win national office without first being appointed to replace a husband. A cons...

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May, Luke (1892-1965)

Luke May, known as America's Sherlock Holmes, was a pioneering "scientific detective" who moved to Seattle in 1919. He was an independent private consulting detective whose work represented a radical ...

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Maynard, Catherine Broshears (1816-1906)

Catherine Simmons Broshears Maynard was an energetic Seattle pioneer. She assisted her husband David (Doc) Maynard (1808-1873) in his several enterprises, including Seattle's first hospital. Many colo...

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Maynard, Dr. David Swinson (1808-1873)

David S. "Doc" Maynard was a colorful and influential figure in King County's early history. Historian Bill Speidel anointed him "The Man Who Invented Seattle." On the advice of Chief Seattle, Maynard...

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Maynard's Point Cemetery

In the early days of Seattle, burials were made at Maynard's Point on the property of Dr. W. S. Maynard (1808-1873). Maynard's Point, the site of Seattle's original business district in present-day (1...

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Mayor Ole Hanson's denunciation of Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power in a 1918 letter to Seattle City Council

This letter, written in June 1918 by Seattle Mayor Ole Hanson (1874-1940), is a scathing denunciation of Puget Sound Traction, Light & Power, the firm that operated Seattle's electric streetcar sy...

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