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Lighthouse for the Blind

The Lighthouse for the Blind was incorporated in Seattle in 1918, with the purpose of advancing the general welfare of the blind. Three of the five men who wrote the articles of incorporation were bli...

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Lighthouses on Cape Disappointment

Despite the Columbia River's breadth where it spills into the Pacific Ocean, early European and American explorers often missed it. Later mariners struggling to find the mouth sometimes wrecked in the...

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Lightships on Washington's Outer Coast

From 1898 to 1971, lightships were important elements in the system of navigation aids along the Washington coast. On May 22, 1898, Light Vessel No. 67 became the first on Washington's coast. She arri...

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LightShows: A Reflection by Tom Robbins

This is an excerpt from an article by novelist Tom Robbins on the lightshows of the 1960s. It appeared in Seattle magazine in 1967, and is reprinted with permission of Tom Robbins.

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Lightshows in Seattle

The first lightshow in the Seattle area occurred on November 5, 1966, when KRAB radio (one of the first community-based FM radio stations in the country) held a benefit concert in Kirkland. It was thi...

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Lime Kiln and Cattle Point Lighthouses (San Juan Island)

There are two lighthouses located on San Juan Island, the largest island in the San Juan archipelago. The Lime Kiln Light Station, built in 1919, is located in Lime Kiln State Park, on the west side o...

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Limestone Quarrying and Limemaking in the San Juan Islands

For more than 60 years -- from 1860 until the 1920s -- San Juan County was the principal lime-producing area in the state of Washington. The San Juan Islands were ideal for the manufacture and transpo...

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Lincoln County -- Thumbnail History

Lincoln County, formed in 1883, is located in northeast Washington in the region historically known as Big Bend Country. The county measures 2311.2 square miles, ranking it seventh in size among Washi...

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Linden Records: Seattle's "lost" post-war music company

The larger-than-life personal saga of Seattle businessman Adolph Frederik Linden (1889-1969) has long overshadowed the publicly known history of one of his numerous enterprises: the Pacific Northwest...

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Little White Church Cemetery (Seattle)

The first church in Seattle was the Methodist Episcopal or the "Little White Church," located downtown on 2nd Avenue and Columbia Street. The White Church Cemetery, next to the church, was Seattle's f...

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Locke, Gary Faye (b. 1950)

Gary Locke rose through the political ranks from humble, minority beginnings to become King County's first Asian American executive in 1994, the first Asian American governor in the United States in 1...

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Locke, Hubert (1934-2018)

Hubert Gaylord Locke was a longtime professor and administrator at the University of Washington, where he served for five years as dean of the School of Public Affairs. Locke was a moral leader, an au...

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Log Cowboy: A Story of Lake Union and Lake Washington by Dorothea Nordstrand

This story about Vern Nordstrand (1918-2009) and his job locating and returning stray logs to their log booms on Seattle's Lake Union and Lake Washington was contributed by Vern's widow, Dorothea Nord...

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Lokout (1834-1913)

Lokout was a Yakama Indian, a sharpshooter against the U.S. military, and an intelligence resource for historians. He outlived most of his friends and adversaries. Born of two chieftain families, he w...

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Long Beach -- Thumbnail History

Long Beach, in Pacific County, one of Washington's oldest seaside resorts, has drawn visitors, first from Oregon and later from all over the Northwest, to its 28 miles of open beach, clam digging grou...

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Long, Stanley (1883-1959)

Stanley Long was a prominent Seattle home builder in the first half of the twentieth century, and was active in civic affairs almost until his death in 1959. Educated in the law in Chicago, Long seems...

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Longacres Racetrack

Longacres racetrack was founded by Seattle real estate magnates Joseph Gottstein (1891-1971) and William Edris and designed by B. Marcus Priteca. It opened in Renton on August 3, 1933. The track was l...

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Longview -- Thumbnail History

The city of Longview is located at the confluence of the Cowlitz and the Columbia rivers in western Cowlitz County, 66 miles upriver from the Pacific Ocean and 67 miles south of Olympia, the state cap...

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Lopes, Manuel (1812-?)

Manuel Lopes arrived in Seattle in 1852, and operated a barbershop equipped with the first barber chair to be brought around Cape Horn. He was Seattle's first black resident, businessman, and property...

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Lopez Island -- Thumbnail History

Lopez Island, surrounded by the cold waters of the Salish Sea, is at 29.5 square miles the third-largest island in San Juan County. It is the first scheduled stop on the Washington State Ferry route f...

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Lord, Alice (1877-1940)

Alice Lord sparked organization of the Seattle Waitresses Union, Local 240 (in 1999, Dining Employees Local #2) in March 1900, and orchestrated the union's successful campaigns to promote pioneering w...

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Lost and Found -- A Japanese Flag's 65-year Journey Home

When Morey Skaret, resident of Fauntleroy (King County), now 95 years old, returned to Seattle after serving in the U.S. Coast Guard during World War II, he brought with him a Japanese banzai flag he ...

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Lou Guzzo, managing editor, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, to Sally Raleigh, lifestyle editor, on the Equal Rights Amendment (1972)

Lou Guzzo (1919-2013), managing editor of the Seattle Post-Intelligencer in the 1970s, sent this memo to Sally Raleigh, editor of the lifestyle section, on March 27, 1972. Guzzo was concerned about th...

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Louie Louie -- the Saga of a Pacific Northwest Hit Song

Richard Berry's 1957 song "Louie Louie" became a huge regional hit in the Pacific Northwest when the Tacoma band the Wailers recorded it 1960. A couple of years later it was recorded in distinct rendi...

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