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Hawaiian Music and its Historic Seattle Connection

The distinctive music of the Hawaiian Islands is easily recognizable -- its signature thrumming of a 'ukulele, thwacking of bamboo percussion sticks (puili), and keening "steel guitar" lines are, toda...

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Hawley, Robert Emmett (1862-1946)

Emmett Hawley was one of the first non-Indian settlers in Lynden, the northwestern Whatcom County town located a few miles below the Canadian border, arriving there as a 10-year-old in the early autum...

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Hay Farming in Washington

Hay has been harvested in Washington since the arrival of the first European residents and remains the fourth most valuable crop in the state, behind only apples, wheat and potatoes. Alfalfa, timothy ...

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Hayner, Jeannette C. (1919-2010)

Despite a late start in politics and competing in a field dominated by men at the time, Jeannette C. Hayner became one of Washington's most powerful state legislators. In 1972 -- 30 years after gettin...

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Hazel Wolf Remembers the McCarthy Era

Hazel Wolf (1898-2000), Seattle's quintessential activist, championed many causes in her 101 years. First an advocate of women's rights, she went on to support labor and environmental issues. She was ...

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Hazzard, Linda Burfield (1867-1938)

Dr. Linda Burfield Hazzard was a sadistic and greedy quack who convinced patients that only by starving themselves for months at a time could they regain their health. Unsurprisingly, many of her pati...

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Hebrew Free Loan Association

The Hebrew Education and Free Loan Association, incorporated in 1914, had the purpose of providing interest-free loans to Seattle's needy. The initial membership of the organization was 60, with dues ...

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Hebrew Ladies Free Loan Society

The Hebrew Ladies Free Loan Society grew out of a whist (card game) and sewing club established in 1909 by women from Bikur Cholim synagague. Bikur Cholim's rabbi refused to accept the women's offer o...

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Helder, Z. Vanessa (1904-1968)

Z. Vanessa Helder was one of Washington state's most distinguished artists of the early twentieth century. Born into a pioneer family, she became the state's leading practitioner of Precisionism, a st...

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Helfgott, Anna (1899-1996)

Anna Helfgott was a vigorous activist for progressive causes and a leader in Seattle's Gray Panthers. In her working years she was a dressmaker and fitter, and was an early member of the International...

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Helix (1967-1970)

Helix, Seattle's first "underground" newspaper, debuted in March 1967, and for more than three years and 125 issues provided its readers news, reviews, opinions, musings, letters, more opinions, poetr...

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Hendrix, Al (1919-2002)

James A. "Al" Hendrix was the father of rock legend Jimi Hendrix (1942-1970). He grew up in Vancouver B.C. and moved to Seattle in 1940. He married Jimi's mother, Lucille Jeter (ca. 1925-1958) in 1942...

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Hendrix, Jimi (1942-1970)

Jimi Hendrix -- the single most famous musician to ever emerge from the Pacific Northwest's music scene -- rose from extremely humble beginnings to establish himself as perhaps the most gifted and inv...

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Henry Branch, The Seattle Public Library, and its Neighborhood

The Susan J. Henry Branch, The Seattle Public Library, was located at 425 Harvard Avenue E on Seattle's Capitol Hill. Opened on August 26, 1954, the Henry Library was named for Susan J. Henry (1854-19...

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Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies is a world-renowned research and educational center that traces its deep Seattle roots back a full century and through various incarnations -- eac...

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Herzl-Ner Tamid Conservative Congregation (Seattle)

Seattle's Herzl-Ner Tamid Conservative Congregation, originally called Herzl's congregation, was named after Theodore Herzl (1860-1904), founder of the World Zionist Organization. It incorporated on S...

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Higginson, Ella Rhoads (1862?-1940)

Ella Higginson was a Bellingham writer who was a nationally known and popular literary voice in her day. She first achieved fame in the 1890s with her short stories and poetry; her best-known poem, "F...

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High Point Branch, The Seattle Public Library

The history of the High Point Branch, The Seattle Public Library is one of turbulence, from the housing boom and mass migrations of World War II to the immigration and urban violence of the 1990s. Sta...

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Higo Variety Store (Seattle)

The Higo 10 Cent Store (later Higo Variety Store, located in Seattle at 602-608 S Jackson Street) represents one of the few threads linking the bustle of Seattle's Japantown of the 1930s to recent eff...

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Hilbert, Vi (1918-2008)

Vi Hilbert, a member of the Upper Skagit tribe, had as her life's work to preserve the Lushootseed (Puget Salish) language and culture. Vi learned Lushootseed (the language of Chief Seattle) as a chil...

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Hill, Andy (1962-2016)

Andy Hill was a Republican state senator from northeast King County who survived stage IV lung cancer before going on to a successful stint in the Washington State Senate. Known for his calm demeanor ...

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Hill Grove Cemetery

Hill Grove cemetery near Seattle-Tacoma airport (at 200th Street and Des Moines Way S.) was started in 1900 and received its most recent burial in 1970. Since its founding, the cemetery property has b...

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Hill, James J. (1838-1916)

James J. Hill, nicknamed the Empire Builder, embodied the archetypal American story of success, rising from poor dock clerk to multimillionaire railroad magnate. In time, Hill had gained control of t...

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Hill, James Jerome (1838-1916)

Joel E. Ferris, a Spokane banker, wrote this article on the life of the railroad entrepreneur James J. Hill for the Winter 1959 edition of The Pacific Northwesterner. It is here edited by David Wilma ...

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