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Filipino Cannery Workers

As early as the 1920s, Filipinos from Seattle were contracted to work in Alaskan canneries. Later efforts at reform of contracting practices led to assassinations of Filipino union organizers in the 1...

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Filmography in Seattle

Since the 1933 debut of Tugboat Annie, Seattle has been featured in more than 100 motion pictures and television features. Generations of Hollywood producers have used Seattle-area scenery and archite...

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Finding Cherry Grove by Hunter Brown

Hunter Brown (1992-2017) wrote this account of locating and then traveling to the site of Cherry Grove, Illinois. Cherry Grove was the town the Denny/Boren family left behind in April 1851 when they s...

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Finding William Hamilton: A Transatlantic Detective Story

Michael Atkins relays the story of William Hamilton, an Irishman who came to Seattle in 1909. One of Hamilton's grand nieces in Ireland posted a query on a usenet group on the internet. Intrigued, Atk...

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Finlay, Jacques Raphael "Jaco" (1768-1828)

Jacques Raphael Finlay, a Canadian fur trader commonly known as Jaco, crossed the Continental Divide in modern-day Alberta and reached the upper Columbia River during the summer of 1806. Working as an...

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Finley, Randy (b. 1942)

Randy Finley -- who became known to a generation of Seattle moviegoers for his long black beard, a habit of wearing an army jacket with his name sewn on it, and his innate ability to generate hype -- ...

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Firland Sanatorium

Firland Sanatorium, Seattle's municipal tuberculosis hospital, opened on May 2, 1911, to help combat what was at the time Seattle's leading cause of death. Firland was located on 34 acres in the Richm...

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Firland Sanatorium: Agnes Johnson Remembers Three Years

Agnes "Aggie" Guttormsen Johnson (b. 1928), is an Everett native. After graduating from Providence Everett School of Nursing in 1949 Agnes was diagnosed with pulmonary tuberculosis and admitted to Fir...

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First African Methodist Episcopal Church (Seattle)

The First African Methodist Episcopal Church, located at 1522 14th Avenue, is the oldest black church in Seattle. Established in 1886 it was designated a Seattle landmark in 1984.

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First Woman Crane Operator at the Port of Seattle

In 1980, a year after graduating from the University of Washington, Kevin Catherine Castle was in the first group of women to join International Longshore and Warehouse Union (ILWU) Seattle Local 19, ...

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Fish Story: Memories of the Cedar River

Homer Venishnick, born in Renton, Washington in 1926, comes from a long line of fishermen whose livelihoods have hinged on the ebb and flow of local rivers. Today he lives in a house he built 50 years...

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Fisher, Elmer H. (ca. 1840-1905)

Elmer H. Fisher was Seattle’s foremost commercial architect for a few years surrounding the great fire of 1889. His extensive Romanesque and Classical Revival building programs, which reflected ...

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Fishermen's Terminal (Seattle)

Fishermen's Terminal on Seattle's Salmon Bay has served as the home port for the Puget Sound-based fishing fleet since it opened in 1914. The Port of Seattle developed the site soon after King County ...

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FitzGerald, James (1910-1973)

Born in Seattle, James FitzGerald studied architecture at the University of Washington, then traveled and studied fine-art painting. During the Great Depression he worked on projects funded by the fed...

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Fletcher, Judge Betty Binns (1923-2012)

Judge Betty Binns Fletcher was appointed to the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals by President Jimmy Carter (b. 1924) in 1979 and carried a full caseload there for 33 years, working to within days of her...

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Fletcher, Kathy (b. 1950)

A Harvard-educated biologist, Kathy Fletcher worked for the Carter White House and spent five years as a staff scientist in various environmental organizations. Since the early 1980s, she has devoted ...

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Flour Milling in Washington -- A Brief History

There have been nearly 160 flour mills in the state of Washington. In 1870 there were 22,573 in the United States. Why were there so many mills, and where did they all go? Why should we be interested?...

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Flowers, Robert J. (b. 1943) and Micki Flowers (b. 1948)

Bob and Micki Flowers have a history of breaking down racial barriers. She was the first female African American broadcaster at KIRO television; he was the first black executive at Washington Mutual b...

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Flu in Washington: The 1918 "Spanish Flu" Pandemic

The misnamed "Spanish Flu" pandemic peaked in late 1918 and remains the most widespread and lethal outbreak of disease to afflict humankind worldwide in recorded history. Small mutations in a flu viru...

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Fluke, John Maurice Sr. (1911-1984)

John M. Fluke Sr., was founder of the John Fluke Engineering Co., later known as Fluke Corp., and was a pioneer in the Pacific Northwest electronics industry. He also was deeply involved in a wide ran...

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Flying Saucers

The modern phenomena of UFOs and "flying saucers" began in Washington state on June 24, 1947, when Kenneth Arnold spotted nine mysterious, high-speed objects "flying like a saucer would" along the cre...

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Flynn, Elizabeth Gurley (1890-1964)

Elizabeth Gurley Flynn was a Socialist activist in the Spokane Free Speech fight that began in October 1909. The free speech movement was an action by members of the Industrial Workers of the World (I...

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Focke, Anne (b. 1945)

Anne Focke has been an integral player in Seattle's cultural life since she graduated from the University of Washington in 1967, one of the first graduates in the university's art-history program. She...

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Foley, Thomas S. (1929-2013)

Unlike many future politicians, as a child Thomas Stephen Foley never imagined himself as a future occupant of the White House, or even in Congress. Yet, as his background placed him in positions whe...

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