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Edmonds -- Thumbnail History

The city of Edmonds rests along a shoreline and the hillside beyond about 15 miles north of Seattle. Native Americans of the Snohomish people occupied coastal and river areas surrounding the site, and...

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Edmonds Cultural Organizations

Edmonds is a waterfront city in South Snohomish County with more than 40,000 residents. Three events a few years apart in the mid twentieth century played key roles the city's thriving cultural life: ...

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Edson, Edward (1860-1944)

Edward "Ed" Edson was a settler in Lynden, located in Whatcom County, who made numerous contributions to the town's early development. He operated the City Drug Store in Lynden for more than 50 years...

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Educating Military Children at Fort Lewis and McChord Field

Camp Lewis, the forerunner of Fort Lewis (and later Joint Base Lewis-McChord) in Pierce County, was constructed in 1917 without family housing or schools. After World War I ended, families moved on to...

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Educating Pioneer Children on San Juan Island

From the earliest days of non-Native settlement on San Juan Island (located in the Salish Sea between the Washington mainland and Vancouver Island) assuring that pioneer children received at least a b...

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Educators Manufacturing Building (Tacoma)

After World War II, a trend toward consolidating schools into larger districts with more modern, standardized facilities created business opportunities for industrial manufacturers. Among these, Educa...

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Edwards, Myrtle (1894-1969)

Myrtle Edwards served on the Seattle City Council from 1955 to 1969, and in March 1969 became president of the council. She carried out her work in public life within the League of Women Voters, the G...

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Ehrlichman, Ben Bernard (1895-1971)

Ben B. Ehrlichman was an investment banker and developer who played a key role in the commercial and civic life of the Puget Sound region from the 1920s through the 1960s. As the president of a holdin...

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Ehrlichman, John D. (1925-1999)

John D. Ehrlichman was a former Seattle land use lawyer who experienced both a meteoric rise and a dramatic fall from grace as a result of his loyalty to President Richard M. Nixon. He was rewarded fo...

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Eisenhowers in Washington State: Big Ike and Little Ike

Edgar Eisenhower (1889-1971), brother of Dwight D. Eisenhower (1890-1969), passed the Washington state bar examination on October 18, 1914. Edgar, one of six brothers including the United States presi...

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Elementary Level: Chief Seattle

Chief Seattle's parents were from tribes on both sides of Elliott Bay and the Duwamish River. He lived during a time of change for his people and the Puget Sound region. He welcomed the Collins and De...

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Elementary Level: Fort Walla Walla

Between 1818 and 1910, there were four outposts named Fort Walla Walla. The first Fort Walla Walla was established as a fur-trading post by the North West Company. The next two were built to house U.S...

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Elementary Level: Horses Change Life on the Columbia Plateau

Hundreds of years ago, the Native Americans who lived in Washington's Columbia Plateau region had no means of traveling on land other than walking. That all changed when local Indian groups began to a...

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Elementary Level: How the Land in Washington Was Formed

Land formations in Washington and the Pacific Northwest were a result of millions of years of changes in weather conditions and the environment. Glaciers and other geological forces created islands, m...

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Elementary Level: Kennewick Man

The skull and bones of a man who lived more than 9,000 years ago were discovered in 1996 near Kennewick, Washington. Archaeologists realized that these remains were very rare. Some wanted to have the ...

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Elementary Level: Legends from Washington State Tribes

For thousands of years, Native Americans preserved their history in a special way. They passed down their traditions and culture to the next generation by means of oral tradition -- or storytelling. A...

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Elementary Level: Makah Whaling

The culture and lifestyle of the Makah Indians is based on the sea. Their homeland is on the Olympic Peninsula in northwestern Washington, along the shore of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the coastli...

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Elementary Level: Marcus and Narcissa Whitman -- Missionaries of the Walla Walla Valley

Marcus and Narcissa Whitman were missionaries who came to the Walla Walla Valley from New York. They wanted to teach Indians about their religion. They also wanted the Indians to change the way they w...

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Elementary Level: Marmes Rockshelter

The Marmes Rockshelter was a very important archaeological find in Washington. Tools, human bones, and a cremation hearth more than 8,000 years old were discovered there. But scientists had a big prob...

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Elementary Level: Mount St. Helens Erupts

Mount St. Helens once was the fifth-highest mountain in Washington. Now, because of a huge eruption on May 18, 1980, it is only the 30th highest peak in the state. There were many signs that the mount...

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Elementary Level: Olmsted Parks of Seattle

By 1903, Seattle had five major public parks but city officials wanted more. They hired the Olmsted Brothers, a landscape architecture company from Massachusetts, to help create more parks. John C. Ol...

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Elementary Level: Prehistoric Animals in Washington

Over the past thousands of years, many varieties of mammals lived in what is now Washington. Several important fossils of prehistoric mammals have been discovered in different parts of the state. (Thi...

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Elementary Level: Princess Angeline, Daughter of Chief Seattle

Kikisoblu, the daughter of Chief Seattle was a friend to early Seattle pioneers. One of the pioneer women, Catherine Maynard, thought Kikisoblu should have a name that would let everyone know that she...

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Elementary Level: The Great Fire of Seattle

Early buildings in what is now the state of Washington were mostly constructed of wood. There were no organized fire departments and not much water that could be used in the event of fire. Seattle's d...

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