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Columbia County Courthouse (1887), Dayton

The Columbia County Courthouse, located on 341 E Main Street in Dayton, is the oldest working courthouse in all of Washington's 39 counties. When the courthouse was completed in 1887, Washington was s...

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Columbia Maternal Association

The Columbia Maternal Association -- the first women's club in what is now Washington state -- was organized in 1838 by the wives of six pioneer missionaries. Only two of the women were mothers at the...

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Columbia National Wildlife Refuge

The Columbia Basin Irrigation Project did more than turn half a million acres of arid Eastern Washington into lush farmland. It also created an enticing stopover for millions of migrating birds. Land ...

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Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

The Columbia River Gorge is a symphony of water and rock, a 90-mile-long passageway sliced through the Cascade Mountains by a river on its way to the sea. The mountains divide the Pacific Northwest in...

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Columbia River Tour

This tour of the Columbia River focuses on state and national parks and wildlife areas. It was written and curated by Cassandra Tate and photographed (except for historical pictures) by Glenn Drosenda...

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Columbia River Treaty -- Historical Background

The Columbia River Treaty, signed in 1961 and ratified in 1964, was a landmark event in the joint U.S.-Canadian possession of the Columbia River. Yet for most of the river's vast history, the notion o...

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Columbia River Treaty -- Planning, Negotiation, and Implementation

The Columbia River Basin encompasses nearly 700,000 square miles in the United States and Canada. The river's main stem and several of its tributaries have their headwaters in eastern British Columbia...

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Columbia River Treaty and Canada

Canada and the United States initially signed the Columbia River Treaty in 1961. At first glance, the treaty seems straightforward, as its formal title suggests: "Treaty Between Canada and the United ...

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Colville -- Thumbnail History

Colville, county seat of Stevens County some 65 miles north of Spokane and 45 miles south of the Canadian border, was incorporated in 1890 but founded much earlier. It traces its origin to Pinkney Cit...

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Colville Valley (1870s-1880s): A 1928 Memoir by Thomas Graham

In 1928, Thomas Graham (1868-1946) wrote a series of articles in the Colville Examiner titled "50 Years Ago," recounting his experiences and observations as a teenager in the Colville Valley. His fami...

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Combine Harvester: Innovating Modern Wheat Farming by History Day Award Winner Christoper Wiley

This essay by Christopher Wiley on the development of the combine harvester won the 2010 Washington State History Day award presented by HistoryLink.org for Outstanding Essay on Washington State Histo...

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Comcomly (1760s?-1830)

Comcomly was a leading figure among the Chinook Indian bands who lived along the lower Columbia River during the period of contact between Native American tribes and Euro-American fur traders. Comcoml...

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Comeford, James Purcell (1833-1909)

James Purcell Comeford first arrived in Snohomish County in 1872 and ran a trading post on the Tulalip Reservation for six years. He founded Marysville in 1878, naming it after his wife Maria. He buil...

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Community Scrapbook: East Green Lake, 1888-1909

This is a scrapbook of photos on the east Green Lake neighborhood of Seattle from 1888-1909, with commentary by historian and photographer Paul Dorpat.

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Congregation Machzikay Hadath

Congregation Machzikay Hadath (Jewish) was incorporated on March 11, 1930. Machzikay Hadath was founded to be more strictly orthodox than any congregation in the city. On October 7, 1979, Machzikay Ha...

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Congress of Racial Equality (CORE), Seattle Chapter

The Seattle Chapter of the Congress of Racial Equality was a powerful force in the city's civil rights movement during the 1960s, spearheading efforts to bring to public attention the inequalities bla...

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Congressional Delegations from Washington

This is a complete historical list of the Washington territorial and state delegation to the United States Congress. Washington Territory was created on March 2, 1853, and the territory became a state...

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Conklin, Mary Ann (1821-1873) aka Mother Damnable

Mary Ann Conklin ran Seattle's first hotel, the Felker House, at Main Street and 1st Avenue S. Her profane vocabulary and fiery temper earned her the moniker "Mother Damnable" which later transmuted i...

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Conna, John N. (1836-1921)

This is a biography and reminiscence of the Tacoma African American pioneer John N. Conna written by his grandson, Douglas Q. Barnett (1931-2019).

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Connelly, Dolly (1913-1995)

Dolly Connelly was a journalist and photographer in the Pacific Northwest. As a stringer for Time, Life, and Sports Illustrated, she covered topics that included the new outdoor recreational activitie...

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Constantine, James Dow (b. 1961)

Dow Constantine, active in politics from a young age, first won elective office -- a seat in the Washington State Legislature -- in 1996. He served on the King County Council from 2002 until 2009, whe...

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Container Shipping in Seattle: Origins and Early Years

From canoes to container ships, a variety of vessels have carried people and goods between Elliott Bay and the wider world for thousands of years. The introduction of new technologies, such as canoes,...

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Cook, Mortimer (1826-1899)

Mortimer Cook (1826-1899), born in Mansfield, Ohio, founded the town of Bug on the northern shore of the Skagit River in 1885 and soon renamed it Sedro. His lasting legacy was building the first dryin...

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Coon Chicken Inn (Seattle)

The Coon Chicken Inn was a fried-chicken restaurant chain located on the Old Bothell Highway on the outskirts of the Seattle city limits, in what is today the Lake City neighborhood of Seattle. The Se...

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