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Carlton Complex Fire

The 2014 Carlton Complex fire, the largest single wildfire in Washington history, burned 256,108 acres, destroyed 353 homes, and caused an estimated $98 million in damage. The fire caused no direct fa...

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Carnation Library, King County Library System

The Carnation Library has been an important cultural center since it first began in 1924, the work of dedicated women volunteers. Located in the small town of Carnation in the Snoqualmie River Valley,...

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Carnation (Tolt) -- Thumbnail History

Carnation (previously Tolt), a rural community along the Snoqualmie River in eastern King County, was founded early in the settlement of the county. The town was named after the world-famous Carnation...

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Carr, Alice Robertson (1899-1996)

Alice Robertson Carr (later de Creeft, 1899-1996) came to the Pacific Northwest early in her life and as a young emerging sculptor is credited with two public monuments for Seattle's Woodland Park in ...

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Carroll, Charles Oliver "Chuck" (1906-2003)

During the 1950s and 1960s, Charles O. "Chuck" Carroll was, arguably, the most powerful man in Seattle and King County. As King County Prosecutor he was the effective head of all law enforcement in th...

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Cashmere -- Thumbnail History

The town of Cashmere in Chelan County is among the most picturesque in Washington. It lies on the southern bank of the Wenatchee River about midway between its turbulent upper reaches at Leavenworth a...

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Cathlamet -- Thumbnail History

As you approach Cathlamet by water, this small town still retains the look of a turn-of-the-century riverfront village. The only incorporated town in Wahkiakum County, this historic community rising u...

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Cathlamet in the 1930s (Marjorie Bacon Brown Remembers) by Crystal J. Ortmann

This portrait of Marjorie Bacon Brown and of Cathlamet in the 1930s was written by Crystal J. Ortmann.

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Catholicism in the Walla Walla Valley

Roman Catholics were among the earliest explorers to enter the Pacific Northwest in the eighteenth century and they were among the earliest settlers in the region in the nineteenth century. The formal...

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Cayton, Horace (1859-1940)

Horace Cayton was the African American publisher of the Seattle Republican, a newspaper directed toward both white and black readers and which at one point had the second largest circulation in the ci...

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Cayuse Indians

The Cayuse Indians were once masters of a vast homeland of more than six million acres in what is now Washington and Oregon. The first of the Northwest tribes to acquire horses, they were relatively f...

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Cedar Creek Bridge (Clark County)

The Cedar Creek Bridge, designated as Clark County's Bridge No. 65 and located at milepost 3.8 on NE Etna Road, was built in 1946, demolished in 2016, and replaced in 2017 by a new bridge. It spans Ce...

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Cedar Falls -- Thumbnail History

Cedar Falls, originally a City Light company town, is located in the upper Cedar River watershed, 30 miles southeast of Seattle. The town's history also encompasses nearby communities that housed rail...

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Cedar River Education Center -- Slideshow

This slideshow documents the opening of the Cedar River Education Center, located in eastern King County on Rattlesnake Lake, on October 2, 2001. Written and photographed by Alan Stein and sponsored b...

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Cedar River Tour

This is a Rivers in Time tour of the Cedar River, home of Seattle's watershed since 1901. Curated by Alan J. Stein. Presented by King County, Seattle Public Utilities, and Seattle City Light.

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Cedar River Watershed (King County) -- Environmental Overview

The Cedar River watershed, located in the eastern central portion of King County, Washington, is nearly 24 miles long, and roughly 10 miles wide. It has been in use as Seattle's main water supply sinc...

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Cedar-Sammamish Watershed

The Cedar-Sammamish Watershed in King County comprises 692 square miles of mountains and valleys that have been shaped by environmental forces and by generations of human activities. The watershed, in...

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Central Library, 1906-1957, The Seattle Public Library

Since 1906, the city block bordered by 4th and 5th avenues and Madison and Spring streets in the heart of downtown Seattle has been the site of a succession of three completely different buildings hou...

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Central Library, 1960-2001, The Seattle Public Library

For more than 40 years, The Seattle Public Library's Central Library at 4th Avenue and Spring Street served as the city's largest branch and as system headquarters. The building with its International...

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Central Library, 2002-present, The Seattle Public Library

The new Central Library of The Seattle Public Library opened in May 2004 in a startlingly unique and widely praised steel-and-glass building designed by Dutch architect Rem Koolhaas. It boasts the mos...

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Central Washington University

The antecedents of Central Washington University in Ellensburg, Washington, go back to 1891. It was statehood in 1889 that spurred Washington's initiative to create public schools and train teachers f...

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Centralia -- Thumbnail History

Centralia's location halfway between the Columbia River and Puget Sound makes it a natural place for people to settle. It is situated in Southwestern Washington on the Chehalis River at its confluence...

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Century 21 -- The 1962 Seattle World's Fair, Part 1

The 1962 Seattle World's Fair, otherwise known as Century 21, gave visitors a glimpse of the future and left Seattle with a lasting legacy. The exposition gave Seattle world-wide recognition, effectiv...

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Century 21 -- The 1962 Seattle World's Fair, Part 2

To many, there never was a fair to compare to the Seattle World's Fair, or Century 21. Between April 21 and October 21, 1962, close to 10 million people visited the fair to climb the Space Needle, rid...

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