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Bullitt Family, The

The family of KING Broadcasting founder Dorothy Stimson Bullitt (Seattle's First Citizen for 1959) continued her tradition of community service and philanthropy and each family member has distinguishe...

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Bullitt, Stimson (1919-2009)

Stimson Bullitt climbed mountains and rock faces, helped transform Seattle's rundown 1st Avenue, served a decade as King Broadcasting Co. president, was a skilled appellate lawyer, championed civil li...

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Bulosan, Carlos (1911?-1956)

Carlos Bulosan was a prolific writer and poet, best remembered as the author of America Is in the Heart, a landmark semi-autobiographical story about the Filipino immigrant experience. Bulosan gained ...

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Bumbershoot: Seattle's Arts Festival

Seattle is the host city for one of the world's best-loved urban music and arts festivals: Bumbershoot. Launched in July 1971 as the Mayor's Festival '71, it initially presented about 150 mostly homeg...

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Bumbershoot's Formative Years (1971-1979)

"Festival 71" was the first of what would become an annual music and arts festival at Seattle Center that became known as "Bumbershoot" starting in 1973. In this People's History, Seattle historian (a...

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Bunker, Dave (b. 1935) and his Electric "Touch" Guitars

Dave Bunker has been deemed an "extremist in guitar invention" and his radical instrument designs once earned him a spot on a list of the Top Ten Weirdest Guitars ever made. Bunker will likely be reme...

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Bunting, Kenneth Freeman (1948-2014)

Ken Bunting was a Texas native who became Seattle's highest ranking African American daily newspaper executive. He worked as a reporter, bureau chief, and editor in various other media markets before ...

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Burgerville (Vancouver)

Second-generation Vancouver restaurateur George Propstra, the son of a Dutch immigrant, opened the first Burgerville USA on March 10, 1961. By 2008, the Vancouver-based fast-food chain had grown to 39...

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Burglon, Nora (1900-1976), Everett Writer, Artist, Teacher

A 1933 Newberry Honor Book winner, Children of the Soil: A Story of Scandinavia (1932), brought acclaim to author, teacher, and folk artist Nora Burglon, who lived in a small Scandinavian-style c...

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Burien -- Thumbnail History

The City of Burien is located in the Highline area of southwest King County, just west of Seattle-Tacoma International Airport and about 14 miles south of downtown Seattle. Incorporated in 1993, Burie...

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Burien Library, King County Library System

Burien's public library was born in 1938 in a tiny building next to a feed store and grew, through sustained community support, into one of the busiest in King County. It was launched as a joint ventu...

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Burke, Judge Thomas (1849-1925)

Thomas Burke, chief justice of the Washington State Supreme Court, arrived in Seattle in 1875 at the age of 25. A lawyer, he began practicing law, and within a couple of years was elected probate judg...

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Burke Museum (Seattle)

The Burke Museum, founded in 1885 by a group of teenage boys, is Washington's oldest museum. Since its inception, the museum has been part of the University of Washington, and has had various homes on...

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Burlington -- Thumbnail History

Burlington is located in western Skagit County, just north of the county seat of Mount Vernon. The community was first established in 1882 as a logging camp, developed into a small town during the ear...

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Burlington Northern Overpass (Skagit County)

The Burlington Northern Overpass, originally known as the Great Northern Overpass, was an integral part of U.S. Route 99, the West Coast's main north-south highway during the middle decades of the twe...

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Burnley Ghost and Other Seattle Apparitions

In his famous, possibly apocryphal, speech of 1854, Chief Seattle is said to have warned his new neighbors that "the dead are not altogether powerless." There have been numerous reports of ghosts and ...

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Burton, Philip (1915-1995)

Philip Burton was a Seattle lawyer for more than 40 years, a voice for the disadvantaged, and a fighter for reforms to end discrimination in education, housing, and employment. His legal actions led t...

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Bush, George (1790?-1863)

George Bush (c. 1790?-1863) was a key leader of the first group of American citizens to settle north of the Columbia River in what is now Washington. Bush was a successful farmer in Missouri, but as a...

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Bush, William Owen (1832-1907)

William Owen Bush was the eldest son of George Bush (1790?-1863), of Irish and African American descent, and Isabella James Bush (1809?-1866), a German American. In 1844 he accompanied his parents and...

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Business and Industry in Seattle in 1900

A look at Seattle area businesses in 1900 indicates that the economy was simpler, life less complicated, labor harder, travel slower, and that opportunities to enhance one's quality of life were rarer...

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Busing in Seattle: A Well-Intentioned Failure

In 1972, the Seattle School District launched the first phase of what became a decades-long experiment with mandatory busing to integrate its schools. Initially limited to a few thousand middle school...

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Butch the Lake Sammamish Seal by Nan P. Campbell

Just 50 years ago last October my husband, Bruce, and I moved to the west side of Lake Sammamish, and became a neighbor of a harbor seal named Butch. This retelling of his story is for my children, an...

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Butler, Maude Eliza Kimball (1880-1963)

Maude Eliza Kimball Butler, born 1880, was a pioneer teacher-educator who devoted her life to public service and her family, a fidelity she inherited from her mother and bequeathed to her children and...

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Butler-Jackson House: Everett Landmark

The Butler-Jackson House at 1703 Grand Avenue is significant for its place in Everett's architectural history and as the home of two prominent and influential, and very different, Everett residents. T...

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