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Library Search Results: Abstracts

Your search for A-Y-P found 124 files.
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Showing 1 - 20 of 40 results

AFM Seattle Local 493 (1918-1958), "Negro Musicians' Union"

Today's labor union for Seattle's professional musicians is the American Federation of Musicians (AFM) Local 76-493, and that numerically cumbersome name reflects perfectly the organization's tangled and sometimes contentious backstory. Seattle's first musicians' union, AFM Local 76, dated back to the 1890s. But as ever-greater numbers of African Americans arrived in the young, growing town the musicians among them soon discovered that the union had an unwritten segregation policy. A complex, Jim Crow system of turf boundaries arose, with Local 76 musicians claiming the most lucrative gigs. Excluded, black musicians founded their own union, Local 458, in 1918. That organization morphed into Local 493 in 1924, and the two unions then co-existed inharmoniously for the next four decades. AFM 493 became a lifeline and social pillar for the black community. It was at the very center of Seattle's vibrant jazz scene, and bore its share of struggles throughout the era's civil rights strife. At its peak in the 1940s, Local 493 probably had about 150 members (compared to Local 76's 1,200), and it represented some of Seattle's biggest African American stars, including Ray Charles (1930-2004), Phil Moore (1918-1987), and Quincy Jones (b. 1933). But changing times and increased racial tolerance eventually saw the two unions formally merge in 1958, an early instance of the more widespread racial integration that was to come during the following decades.
File 10329: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Baby Incubator Exhibit and Cafe

Washington's first World's Fair -- the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition -- was held in Seattle on the grounds of the University of Washington campus between June 1 and October 16, 1909, and drew more than three million people. The Pay Streak was the A-Y-P Exposition's midway area. It offered (for a price) a dizzying array of carnival rides, souvenirs, refreshments, and quasi-educational exhibits. These last involved the display of human beings in varying degrees of their (purported) natural settings, going about what was supposedly their usual daily work. The Baby Incubator Exhibit, which introduced fairgoers to an early version of mechanical controlled environments for the benefit of premature infants, featured living human babies as the (passive) performers, demonstrating applied science in the nursery decades before such technology was commonly integrated into neonatal care in hospitals.
File 8921: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Chinese Village

The Chinese Village was built for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition in Seattle in 1909. The exposition took place between June 1 and October 16, 1909, drawing more than three million people. Visitors came from around the state, the nation, and the world to view hundreds of educational exhibits, stroll the lushly manicured grounds, and be entertained on the Pay Streak midway, while Seattle promoted itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia. The development and management of the Chinese Village was handled by Ah King (1863-1915), a successful Chinese merchant in Seattle. It was located in the northern part of the Pay Streak, right next to the Ferris wheel, and featured three buildings, including a Chinese temple, a restaurant, and a theater with acts that changed daily.
File 8964: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Committees

The 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition was held in Seattle on the University of Washington campus from June 1 to October 16. This was Washington's first world's fair and it celebrated 12 years of prosperity -- since the 1897 Alaska Gold Rush -- through the display of resources, products, and advantages of Washington and the region. More than three million people visited the fair from Washington cities and counties and from the rest of the country. Planning, funding, and producing the A-Y-P Exposition required the talents of many civic leaders. Many of these leaders served on the committees of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition Corporation. The Alaska-Yukon Exposition Corporation was formed May 8, 1906. On May 31, 1906, the word "Pacific" was added to the corporation's name. What follows is a list of the committees of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Corporation, as enumerated in the Secretary's Report of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (Seattle: Gateway Printing, 1911). Birth/death dates were added by the HistoryLink.org staff in 2012.
File 8630: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Hoo-Hoo House

The Hoo-Hoo House was built by the Hoo-Hoo, a lumberman's fraternity, for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition in Seattle in 1909. The exposition took place between June 1 and October 16, 1909, drawing more than three million people. Visitors came from around the state, the nation, and the world to view hundreds of educational exhibits, stroll the lushly manicured grounds, and be entertained on the Pay Streak midway, while Seattle promoted itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia. The Hoo-Hoo House was open to Hoo-Hoo members and lumbermen during the exposition. The house was particularly known for its two large ornamental cats in front of the building with green electric eyes which shone brightly at night. After the exposition ended, the building served as the University of Washington Faculty Club until it was demolished in 1959.
File 8655: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Music at the Fair

Washington's first World's Fair -- the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition -- was held in Seattle on the grounds of the University of Washington campus between June 1 and October 16, 1909, and drew more than three million people. Visitors came from far and wide to be entertained while Seattle promoted itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia. Among the many attractions were musical performances -- parades, dances, and concerts in the Auditorium, Amphitheatre, Music Pavilion, and central bandstand -- by a wide variety of entertainers representing various towns in the region, states in the union, and nations of the world. Included in the offerings were the exotic sounds of various foreign music traditions, big-time bands from Chicago and New York, a down-home southern vaudeville revue, and numerous local ensembles from Tacoma, Spokane, Yakima, Long Beach, and homegrown headliners from Seattle.
File 8876: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Pay Streak Amusements

The 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition was held in Seattle on the University of Washington campus from June 1 to October 16. This was Washington's first world's fair and it celebrated 12 years of prosperity -- since the 1897 Alaska Gold Rush -- through the display of resources, products, and advantages of Washington and the region. More than three million people visited the fair from Washington cities and counties and from the rest of the country. The Pay Streak was the A-Y-P Exposition's midway area. It offered (for a price) a dizzying array of carnival rides, quasi-educational exhibits, souvenirs, and refreshments. It was a magnet for fairgoers of all ages. This file contains a list of the A-Y-P Exposition's gross receipts and exposition revenue generated by amusements, restaurants, and merchandise concessions during the course of the fair, as enumerated in the Secretary's Report of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (Seattle: Gateway Printing, 1911). Most, but not all, of these businesses were located on or near the Pay Streak. Some businesses operated for only a few weeks. Others operated throughout the course of the fair. This list excludes revenue generated within exhibit buildings.
File 8635: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Special Days

The 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition was held in Seattle on the University of Washington campus from June 1 to October 16. This was Washington's first world's fair and it celebrated 12 years of prosperity -- since the 1897 Alaska Gold Rush -- through the display of resources, products, and advantages of Washington and the region. More than three million people visited the fair from Washington cities and counties and from the rest of the country. Throughout the exposition, commemorative days were set aside to honor organizations, professions, and ethnic communities, as well as visitors from various cities, counties, and states. Some of these commemorations included banquets, conferences, or other forms of special recognition given to the groups being honored. Because these events were so popular with fairgoers, A-Y-P promoters kept adding new commemorative days as the fair progressed. Thus, some days had mulitple honorees.This file contains a list of all A-Y-P commemorative days as reported in The Seattle Daily Times, The Seattle Sunday Times, and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.
File 8461: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): The Olmsted Legacy

The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition was held in Seattle at the University of Washington campus from June 1 to October 16, 1909. Planning for its extensive landscaped grounds and many buildings began several years before opening day. In October 1906, the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition Company hired landscape architect John C. Olmsted (1852-1920) of the prestigious Olmsted Brothers firm of Brookline, Massachusetts, to design the grounds. The A-Y-P Exposition Company leased the southern portion of campus where the forest had been cut over once, but where second-growth trees and dense underbrush covered the slope from about 41st Street to the lakeshore. Olmsted developed a plan that would serve the needs of the fair as well as those of the university after the exposition ended. His plan differed from other world's fair plans in that it relied on the natural scenery, including Mount Rainier and Lake Washington and Lake Union, for focal points around which he laid out the buildings, roads, and paths. By the time of the fair's opening in 1909, gardeners had transformed the forest into a park with avenues, paths, cascading water emptying into the Geyser Basin (now Drumheller Fountain), buildings, and beautiful vistas looking out onto Seattle's distinctive natural surroundings. A hundred years later, elements of the Olmsted design remain as legacies of the exposition.
File 8873: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Woman Suffrage

During the first week of July 1909, suffrage proponents from across the country gathered in Seattle to participate in the 41st Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association and to celebrate Woman Suffrage Day at Washington's first world's fair, the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, currently underway on the University of Washington campus. The Washington Equal Suffrage Association convention, held the day before the National convention, drew suffragists from around the state. The suffragists, their conventions, and their appearances in area clubs and churches received copious coverage in local newspapers and captured the attention of thousands of Washingtonians attending the A-Y-P Exposition. Suffragists used the A-Y-P as a massive public relations opportunity and this exposure was an important component in how Washington women achieved the vote on November 8, 1910.
File 8587: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, 1909 -- A Slideshow of Seattle's First World's Fair

This is a Slideshow on the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, Washington's first World's Fair, which opened on June 1, 1909, and closed on October 16, 1909. More than three million people visited the fair, which took place in Seattle on the University of Washington campus. Written and Curated by Paul Dorpat, with Chris Goodman. Presented by Safeco.
File 7082: Full Text >

Anderson, Otto (1857-1938), Furniture Designer and Guitar-Maker

The excellent wood-working skills of Swedish immigrant, Otto Edward Anderson provided him with good job opportunities upon his arrival in the Pacific Northwest in 1888. One highlight of his career must have been winning a gold award at Seattle's first world's fair -- the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition -- for the innovative designs of some fine handcrafted furniture. But in hindsight, it seems that it was his years of making musical string instruments -- guitars, violins, and perhaps a mandolin -- and an association with the region's legendary instrument manufacturer, Chris J. Knutsen, which may bring him longer-lasting fame.
File 8916: Full Text >

Asberry, Nettie Craig (1865-1968)

Nettie Craig Asberry was an extraordinary, early African American resident of Tacoma who was known for her work in fighting racism and in helping to open doors for women. A founding member of the Tacoma NAACP, a music teacher, a club woman, and in later years a volunteer social worker in the community, she was a Tacoma icon.
File 8632: Full Text >

Bicycle Tree at Snohomish (1890-1927) -- A Slideshow

This slideshow presents the vintage postcard collection of Peter Blecha on the enormous and curious "bike tree," located in Snohomish County within what is now Snohomish city limits. The slide show was written and curated by Peter Blecha and funded by the Henry M. Jackson foundation.
File 8526: Full Text >

Blue Laws -- Washington State

On November 8, 1966, Washington state voters adopted Initiative 229, repealing the so-called "Blue Law," which had been enacted in 1909. This action legalized the operations of thousands of businesses in the state that had been opening on Sunday in violation of that law, and eliminated the legal bias favoring religions whose day of worship was Sunday. It also ultimately led to the sale of liquor on Sunday in the state.
File 9057: Full Text >

Broderick, Henry (1880-1975)

Henry Broderick was a highly respected Seattle civic leader and the longtime president of the city's largest real estate firm. From the time he arrived in town in 1901 until his death seven decades later, Broderick was involved in almost every important aspect of Seattle civic life, boosting, chairing, contributing financially, and most importantly observing and recording what he saw, foibles and all. For his extensive and unique contribution to the fabric of life in Seattle, the Seattle-King County Association of Realtors named Henry Broderick First Citizen of 1952.
File 7701: Full Text >

Burke Museum (Seattle)

The Burke Museum, founded in 1885 by a group of teenage boys, is Washington's oldest museum. Since its inception, the museum has been part of the University of Washington, and has had various homes on campus. The museum is responsible for Washington state collections of natural history and cultural heritage.
File 8468: Full Text >

Contains Audio/Video

Century 21 -- The 1962 Seattle World's Fair, Part 1

The 1962 Seattle World's Fair, otherwise known as Century 21, gave visitors a glimpse of the future and left Seattle with a lasting legacy. The exposition gave Seattle world-wide recognition, effectively "putting it on the map." Years of planning went into the fair through the hard work of visionaries, go-getters, civic boosters, and dreamers. Many of the concepts and icons of Century 21 remain ingrained in Seattle culture, even as the "real" 21st Century begins.
File 2290: Full Text >

Chilberg, John Edward (1867-1954)

John Edward "Ed" Chilberg, a prominent Seattle merchant and banker, was among the first to promote the idea of a grand world's fair in Washington state. He saw the opportunity to celebrate our Far Corner as a player in the nation's cultural and economic life. With his handsome profile and as president of The Alaska Club (later The Arctic Club), Chilberg was chosen president of a noisy and colorful 1909 Seattle milestone called the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition.
File 8753: Full Text >

Contains Audio/Video

Foster, Donald Isle (1925-2012)

The great-grandson of Oregon Trail emigrants, Donald Isle Foster hails from a solid line of Pacific Northwest pioneers. He first came to prominence in the business community as the Director of Exhibits for Seattle's 1962 World's Fair (the Century 21 Exposition). Later he earned a reputation as one of the town's consummate aesthetes and a pillar of the local arts establishment during his 30 years with the taste-making Foster / White Gallery in Seattle's Pioneer Square neighborhood. Along the way, Foster fostered the careers of many of the Northwest's finest artists and he also benefited the community by serving on high-profile posts with the Seattle Symphony board, the Seattle Repertory Theater board, and the guiding committee of the Seattle Art Museum. (Note: This essay benefits greatly from extensive quotes taken from a recorded interview with Foster conducted in 2010 by Kathrine Beck and C. David Hughbanks.) Donald Foster died on March 24, 2012, in Palm Springs, California, survived by his longtime partner, Terry Arnett.
File 9618: Full Text >

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Showing 1 - 20 of 80 results

Latona Bridge spanning Seattle's Lake Union is dedicated on July 1, 1891.

On July 1, 1891, the first Latona Bridge, which spans Seattle's Lake Union, is dedicated. The fixed-span bridge crosses Lake Union from the Eastlake neighborhood to the University District, and supplants a certain amount of rowboat traffic on Lake Union. It crosses the lake at the position of the future Interstate-5 bridge. In 1919, the University Bridge (a bascule bridge) replaces the Latona Bridge.
File 3328: Full Text >

Washington State Legislature passes law prohibiting the sale of alcohol on the University of Washington campus in Seattle on March 19, 1895.

On March 19, 1895, the Washington State Legislature unanimously passes a law prohibiting the sale of alcohol on the University of Washington campus in Seattle and within two miles of the campus, with the exception of the Madison Park business district, which lies just at the edge of the two-mile radius. The bill passes unanimously and without controversy. In 1906 the issue will come under consideration again when the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition Company begins searching for a site for the world's fair to be held in 1909. The campus would provide a spectacular site with ample room, but one with a prohibition on selling alcohol. At a different site, the A-Y-P Exposition Company would receive substantial income from alcohol concessions. The company will decide to use the campus, much to the chagrin of some, and the fair will nevertheless make a profit during its run in 1909. In 2009, the sale of alcohol on the university campus remains limited to special events, although today it is the UW Board of Regents, not the legislature, that determines the school's alcohol policy.
File 8940: Full Text >

Alaska Club incorporates to promote Alaska on December 7, 1903.

On December 7, 1903, The Alaska Club incorporates with the object of promoting Alaska and its resources. Housed before long on the 15th floor of the new Alaska Building at 2nd Avenue and Cherry Street in downtown Seattle, the club offers a meeting room, a reading room, and an exhibit on Alaska in its reception area. The club also serves as an information bureau, publishing The Alaska Almanac annually. In 1908 the Alaska Club merges with the Arctic Club, a social organization of people from Alaska or connected with it through business. The new club, known as the Arctic Club, combines the social and business aspects of the two organizations. After 1914, the Arctic Building at 3rd Avenue and Cherry Street houses their offices and gathering rooms, including the famous Dome Room. The club disbands in 1971, most of its members having succumbed to old age, 74 years after the Gold Rush started.
File 8707: Full Text >

The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition Company signs a lease with the UW Board of Regents providing for the A-Y-P to be sited on campus grounds on September 27, 1906.

On September 27, 1906, the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition Company signs a lease with the University of Washington Board of Regents, providing for the A-Y-P to be sited on campus grounds. The A-Y-P will be a world's fair to be held from June 1 to October 16, 1909. The Grounds and Buildings Committee of the A-Y-P Company considered other locations in the city, including Bailey Peninsula (now Seward Park), Mount Baker Park, Washington Park, and Magnolia. The university campus's hundreds of acres of undeveloped land, proximity to downtown Seattle, and spectacular views of mountains and lakes all factor into its selection. UW Professor Edmond S. Meany (1862-1935) strongly advocated for the campus site because of the university would gain buildings for student use and the forested acreage would be cleared and graded for future construction.
File 8966: Full Text >

Baby incubator sideshow display opens at the Wonderland Exhibit in Seattle on November 4, 1906.

On November 4, 1906, what is almost certainly Seattle's first sideshow-style exhibition of living human infants in baby incubator machines opens as part of the so-called Wonderland Exhibit at 906 2nd Avenue in downtown Seattle. The exhibit features three incubators and is heavily advertised in local newspapers in an attempt to create an emotional connection between ticket buyers and the babies, and encouraging repeat business.
File 10410: Full Text >

Regents of the University of Washington approve John C. Olmsted's plan for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition on May 17, 1907.

On May 17, 1907, the University of Washington's Board of Regents approves the plan for the grounds of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, a world's fair to be held on campus from June 1 to October 16, 1909. John C. Olmsted (1852-1920) of the Olmsted Brothers landscape architecture firm had developed the plan over the previous several months. It would transform the forested campus into a park for the world's fair and into a future site for the growing university. Upon the regents' approval of the plan, a two-year frenzy of construction begins.
File 8939: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition groundbreaking ceremonies take place on June 1, 1907.

On June 1, 1907, Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition groundbreaking ceremonies are held at the south end of the University of Washington campus in Seattle. One hundred acres of old-growth Douglas firs are cut down for the fairgrounds.
File 692: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition landscaping crews put the finishing touches on a 20-acre nursery on October 1, 1907.

On October 1, 1907, Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition landscaping crews put the finishing touches on a 20-acre nursery for plants and sod in preparation for the spring of 1909, when they will need millions of plants to landscape the exposition grounds. John C. Olmsted (1852-1920) of the Olmsted Brothers landscape architecture firm designed the plan for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, a world's fair to be held at the University of Washington campus from June 1 to October 16, 1909. Olmsted's plan for the fair will transform the forested campus into a park replete with formal gardens, expanses of lawns, paths, avenues, millions of plants around buildings and in beds, and remnant forest. By the time the exposition opens, gardeners will have planted more than two million trees, perennials, and annuals around the grounds, including 10,000 rhododendrons, 5,000 roses, and 80,000 dwarf phlox.
File 8980: Full Text >

Grading crews finish work on the Rainier Vista (designed for Seattle's A-Y-P Exposition on the UW campus) on May 1, 1908.

On May 1, 1908, grading crews complete the sculpting of the Rainier Vista out of the forest and hills of Seattle's University of Washington campus in preparation for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, a world's fair to be held at the university campus from June 1 to October 16, 1909. Crews smoothed the rough ground into an even slope leading down to the lakeshores and then terraced part of the slope into a series of level plains on which to build the exposition's temporary and permanent buildings. They cut a web of avenues into the hillside to provide access to the fairgrounds, some of which continue to serve the university today. John C. Olmsted (1852-1920), a landscape architect and partner in the Olmsted Brothers firm that created Seattle's park and boulevard system and an earlier plan for the university campus, developed the landscape plan for the exposition. The regrading created the campus that has served the university for the past centur, both in the space it created for continued growth and in its beauty.
File 8982: Full Text >

Cornerstone of the governor's mansion in Olympia is laid on August 1, 1908.

On August 1, 1908, the cornerstone of the governor's mansion in Olympia is laid in a ceremony conducted by the Masonic Grand Lodge of the State of Washington. Royal A. Gove (1856-1951), Most Worshipful Grand Master, presides, together with State Treasurer George G. Mills. A copy of the program, a roster of state officials, copies of Olympia and Tacoma newspapers, and an Olympia Booster Book are among the items sealed within the cornerstone, which is made of Washington marble. Governor Albert E. Mead (1861-1913) witnesses the ceremony, along with several hundred other celebrants.
File 9039: Full Text >

Siberian Yupik arrive in Olympia en route to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition on September 27, 1908.

On September 27, 1908, six Siberian Yupik families disembark at Olympia on their way to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition. The exposition, Washington's first world's fair, is to be held on the University of Washington campus in Seattle from June to October 1909. Exhibits at the fair will highlight West Coast resources, agriculture, and manufacturing along with that of other countries around the Pacific Rim. Much of the entertainment will purport to educate visitors about the cultures of the Pacific, such as that of the people they called Eskimos.
File 8913: Full Text >

Washington Equal Suffrage Association publishes Washington Women's Cook Book in Seattle in late 1908.

In late 1908, the Washington Equal Suffrage Association publishes the Washington Women's Cook Book. The book, comprising recipes donated by suffragists from around the state, is planned as a fundraiser for the group and to carry the woman suffrage message into Washington homes. In February 1909 the Washington State Legislature agrees to place an equal suffrage amendment on the November 1910 ballot. The Washington Women's Cook Book is sold during the 1909-1910 suffrage campaign, including at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, becoming part of Washington suffragists' so-called "still hunt" strategy to win the support of male voters through the influence of their daughters, wives, and mothers.
File 8552: Full Text >

Seattle City Light installs an ornamental street lighting system in 1909.

In 1909, Seattle City Light installs an ornamental street lighting system in preparation for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. This improvement coincides with the extensive regrading of huge tracts of land in the commercial downtown and surrounding neighborhoods. The promise of thousands of visitors places the city's image in the forefront of city planning and budget decisions.
File 1724: Full Text >

Washington State Legislature, on February 10, 1909, tables a proposed bill that would have required visitors from Japan to the A-Y-P Exposition to post bond ensuring their return to Japan.

On February 10, 1909, both houses of the Washington State Legislature resolve to table proposed legislation requiring visitors from Japan who attend the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition to post a bond for their return to Japan. This is done at the request of Acting Governor Marion Hay (1865-1933), who had been contacted by Secretary of State Robert Bacon (1860-1919). Bacon sought to prevent any anti-Japanese bills from being introduced into the Legislature in order to preserve good relations with Japan's government.
File 9037: Full Text >

Railroad workers lay the last rail of the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound Railway's line at Snoqualmie Pass on March 29, 1909.

On March 29, 1909, railroad workers lay the last rail of the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound Railway's line (later named the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway) at Snoqualmie Pass, just in time to carry passengers from Eastern Washington to Seattle for the opening of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. Nearly four million fairgoers will visit the exposition, a world's fair located on the University of Washington campus that will run from June 1, 1909 to October 16, 1909. Fairgoers traveling to Seattle from around the state, country, and world, will mostly arrive by train or ship, since there are few roads crossing the mountains.
File 9090: Full Text >

UW hosts lecture by Rev. Herbert H. Gowen on May 11, 1909, to inaugurate new Department of Oriental Subjects.

On May 11, 1909 -- a mere three weeks prior to the Grand Opening on June 1, 1909 of Seattle's first World's Fair (the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, which was mounted on a portion of the current University of Washington campus) -- another historic event took place at the new Auditorium Building (later renamed: Meany Hall). UW faculty and senior students were summoned to attend an inaugural lecture by Reverend Herbert H. Gowen (1864-1960), the newly appointed Chair of the Department of Oriental History, Literature, and Institutions (or "Oriental Subjects"). This department will evolve to eventually (in 1983) become the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies.
File 8999: Full Text >

Seattle races to complete infrastructural improvements needed for June opening of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in May 1909.

In May 1909, Seattle races to complete infrastructural improvements required for the upcoming opening of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. On May 13, 1909, just 17 days until the opening, the Seattle Times front-page headline reads, "The Fair Will Be Ready, Will Seattle?" As the fair approaches, the city races to complete improvements in the Brooklyn neighborhood (later renamed University District) for the exposition and the crowds of visitors they anticipate. In time for the fair the city will complete a new sewer line, graded roads with curbs and sidewalks, two new double-track streetcar lines, and street lighting.
File 8774: Full Text >

Lettie Lee Rochester, age 14, receives the first season ticket to the A-Y-P Exposition, as reported on May 17, 1909.

On May 17, 1909, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports that 14-year-old Lettie (Letitia) Lee Rochester (later Lettie Lee Craig, 1894-1968), a student at Seattle's Lincoln High School, is to receive the first season ticket to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition. She receives the souvenir coupon book as a reward for her studiousness. The fair's department of admissions had received many simultaneous applications this first season ticket. The problem of who should be so honored was solved a businessman purchased the coupon book, offering to give it to a school girl as a reward for her studiousness. Lettie Rochester, daughter of the late Judge Junius Rochester, is chosen. She has received an "excellent" in English, algebra, ancient history, Latin, and German, and dreams of being a lawyer. The exposition will open on June 1 and will draw more than three million visitors before it closes on October 16, 1909. Visitors from around the state, the nation, and the world will view hundreds of educational exhibits, stroll the lushly manicured grounds, and be entertained on the Pay Streak midway, while Seattle promotes itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia.
File 9196: Full Text >

Queenie the elephant causes pandemonium at Seattle's White City amusement park on May 28, 1909.

On May 28, 1909, Queenie the elephant escapes in White City, a short-lived amusement park located in Seattle's Madison Park neighborhood. A ruckus ensues and some slight damage is done before the elephant is recaptured.
File 7652: Full Text >

Sorrento Hotel opens in Seattle on May 30, 1909.

On May 30, 1909, The Seattle Times lauds the newly opened Sorrento Hotel as a "credit to Seattle." The 150-room hotel opens just in time for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, a world's fair that will open June 1st at the University of Washington campus. Designed by Harlan Thomas (1870-1953) for Samuel Rosenberg (1859-1915), a local clothing retailer, the luxury hotel includes design elements inspired by the Italian town for which it is named. In a city not far removed from its pioneer days, the Sorrento embodies the sense Seattleites have on the eve of the A-Y-P that Seattle has arrived on the world stage. The hotel remains open a hundred years later, its elegance rejuvenated by restoration work in the 1980s.
File 8797: Full Text >

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Mapleine Advertisement, 1909

Mapleine is an imitation maple flavoring originally produced by Seattle's Crescent Manufacturing Company in 1905. Mapleine quickly became Crescent's signature product. The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (A-Y-P), held on the University of Washington campus in 1909, attracted more than three million fairgoers during its four-month run, and offered businesses like Crescent an important opportunity to showcase their products to the public Crescent's Mapleine booth in the Manufactures Building (along with smaller booths around the fairgrounds) touted the product and offered samples of ice cream and confections flavored with Mapleine. This full-page advertisement for Mapleine appeared in the monthly magazine The Coast: Alaska And Greater Northwest in September 1909 (pp. 203-204). Note: McCormick & Company, Inc., based in Baltimore, Maryland, currently (2011) distributes Mapleine on a limited basis.
File 9938: Full Text >

Marilyn Gandy Scherrer discusses Laurene and Joe Gandy's Seattle World's Fair memories

Laurene Tatlow Gandy (1908-1993) was widely acknowledged as the First Lady of the Century 21 Exposition -- 1962 Seattle World's Fair, and was one of that fair's most important assets. With her husband, Seattle World's Fair president Joseph E. Gandy (1904-1971), she graciously welcomed and entertained visiting dignitaries and their families throughout the fair's six-month run. In the decades following the fair, Laurene Gandy continued to support and nurture the Seattle World's Fair's most important legacy, Seattle Center. In 1977, Laurene Gandy helped found Seattle Center Foundation, the nonprofit organization that raises funds by encouraging foundation, governmental, and private contributions to the Center. This People's History is based on a presentation that Joe and Laurene Gandy's daughter, Marilyn Gandy Scherrer, prepared for Seattle's Sunset Club, an organization of which Laurene Gandy was a longtime member and past president. As she explains, Marilyn Gandy Scherrer's presentation is based on a compilation of speeches that Laurene Gandy delivered to community groups in the years following the fair, and a speech that Joseph Gandy delivered to the Seattle Rotary weeks after the fair closed.
File 9994: Full Text >

Roslyn Mine disaster (October 3, 1909): The Official Investigative Report of the Washington State Inspector of Coal Mines

This People's History presents the full official investigative report prepared by the state Inspector of Coal Mines after an explosion at the Roslyn Mine on October 3, 1909, claimed the lives of 10 miners. Another Roslyn mine had earlier been the scene of the state's worst mine disaster, an 1892 explosion and fire that killed 45 men.This report on the 1909 disaster was contributed by Bill Kombol, manager of Palmer Coking Coal Co.
File 9182: Full Text >

The Exposition: A Contemporary Report on the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition by Mateel Howe (1909)

This is a contemporary report on the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, Washington's first world's fair. The exposition took place between June 1 and October 16, 1909, drawing more than three million people. Visitors came from around the state, the nation, and the world to view hundreds of educational exhibits, stroll the lushly manicured grounds, and be entertained on the Pay Streak midway, while Seattle promoted itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia. Mateel Howe was sent to the exposition from her home in Portland to report on its opening week by the newspaper The Independent. This is a reprint of her report published as "The Exposition," The Independent, June 24, 1909, p. 1368
File 8892: Full Text >

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