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Library Search Results: Abstracts

Your search for visualarts found 96 files.
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Showing 1 - 20 of 56 results

Allied Arts of Seattle

Allied Arts of Seattle is one of the city's most influential advocates for urban design and the arts. It grew out of the Beer & Culture Society, a small circle of academics, architects, and artists who first met in early 1952. On October 3, 1954, they convened a Congress of the Arts that established Allied Arts as a permanent organization to advocate for public funding of the arts, better urban planning and architecture, and other civic improvements. Allied Arts has since played leadership roles in promoting the creation of the Seattle Arts Commission; the development of Seattle Center; the preservation of Pike Place Market, Pioneer Square, and other historic landmarks; and other causes.
File 2212: Full Text >

Anderson, Guy (1906-1998), Painter

Guy Anderson was, according to Bruce Guenther, former curator of modern art at the Seattle Art Museum, "perhaps the most powerful artist to emerge from the Northwest School." Partly by virtue of his semi-reclusive lifestyle, and partly through the profound gravity of the giant paintings that issued from his studio, Anderson occupied an elevated niche in the Northwest art world. This biography of Guy Anderson is reprinted from Deloris Tarzan Ament's Iridescent Light: The Emergence of Northwest Art (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2002).
File 5157: Full Text >

Angell, Tony (b. 1940), Painter and Sculptor

Tony Angell is an eminent Pacific Northwest painter and sculptor whose work has often centered on birds, especially ravens and crows. He is also an author. Since 1971, he has been Washington State Director of Environmental Education. Washington State chapter of the Nature Conservancy. This biography of Tony Angell is reprinted from Deloris Tarzan Ament's Iridescent Light: The Emergence of Northwest Art (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2002).
File 5329: Full Text >

Artists of Washington State During World War II

In 1935, a group of artists in New York City formed the American Artists Congress as a response to the growth of Fascism throughout the world. Three Washington state artists signed the original Call of the organization: Kenneth Callahan (1905-1986), Thomas Handforth (1897-1948), and Barney Nestor (1903-1974). Several other regional artists would eventually align themselves with the organization and participated in their exhibitions. Like their contemporaries, some Washington state artists addressed themes of war in their work, either in support of the effort or through anti-war and pacifist imagery.
File 8435: Full Text >

Bellevue Art Museum

The Bellevue Art Museum originated in 1947 as a street-based art fair, and then moved indoors, first to a surplus schoolhouse, then to a former funeral home, later to the somewhat isolated third floor of the Bellevue Square shopping center. On January 13, 2001, it officially opened its first purpose-built home, a bold red-stained concrete structure located at NE 6th Street and Bellevue Way in the heart of the city's downtown. It is the first major avant-garde building on the Eastside, intended, according to architect Steven Holl (b. 1947), as "a prototype for urbanizing a sprawling suburban zone" through its compactness, underground parking, and lot-filling form. The building served for two-and-a-half years before the Bellevue Art Museum closed its doors due to lack of funds. After hiring as director veteran curator of crafts and design Michael Monroe, and raising $3 million, the museum reopened on June 18, 2005, with a new focus on crafts and a new name -- Bellevue Arts Museum.
File 2936: Full Text >

Bellevue Film Festival, 1967-1981

The Bellevue Film Festival (1967-1981) was born in 1967, under the leadership of longtime Bellevue Arts & Crafts Fair volunteers Carol Duke and Mary Jo Malone. Most of the handful of U.S. film festivals in the late 1960s devoted to short experimental films had grown directly out of a struggling national network of fringe arts communities in larger cities such as New York and San Francisco, or on college campuses with film schools, such as the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor. Despite their lack of direct experience in this fringe artworld, Carol Duke and her Arts & Crafts Fair colleagues quickly learned how to set up and run an experimental film festival that became one of the three most respected in America by media artists and the denizens of their world.
File 3469: Full Text >

Bowen, Betty (1918-1977)

Betty Bowen was assistant director of the Seattle Art Museum, a civic activist on behalf of the arts and historic preservation, and an indefatigable promoter of Seattle artists. Two days before her death at age 58, Mayor Wes Uhlman (b. 1935) named her First Citizen of Seattle and proclaimed Valentine's Day in her honor.
File 662: Full Text >

Callahan, Kenneth (1905-1986), Painter

The Spokane-born painter Kenneth Callahan was one of the leading artists of the Pacific Northwest school. As a young painter he was exhibited in the First Biennial Exhibition of Contemporary Art at the Whitney Museum in New York. He subsequently was recognized in a breakthrough 1953 Life magazine article as one of the "Mystic Painters of the Northwest." He spent years working as a curator at the Seattle Art Museum, and when he was fired in 1952 (he had been using the museum as a studio, which a new curator found reprehensible), he continued painting and selling paintings from his studio on the south fork of the Stillaguamish River, near Granite Falls in Snohomish County. This biography of Kenneth Callahan is reprinted from Deloris Tarzan Ament's Iridescent Light: The Emergence of Northwest Art (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2002).
File 5203: Full Text >

Cape Disappointment State Park

Cape Disappointment State Park juts into the Pacific Ocean at the tip of the Long Beach Peninsula, in the southwesternmost corner of Washington state. This is the place where Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Volunteers for Northwestern Discovery ended their long journey to the sea. They carved their names and the date -- November 18, 1805 -- on a tree, pausing to watch the powerful surf breaking on the rocks below. Exactly 200 years later, members of the Chinook Tribe, art patrons, politicians, and community leaders gathered here to dedicate the first phase of the Confluence Project, designed by famed artist and architect Maya Lin (b. 1959) to commemorate the Lewis-Clark Expedition. For Lin, Cape Disappointment is a study in convergence: water and land, river and ocean, white explorers and Native Americans, past and present. "Here is where we hold up a mirror to the Lewis and Clark story," she says. "Our journey begins here" (Confluence Project website).
File 7602: Full Text >

Century 21 World's Fair: Northwest Coast Indian Art Exhibit

The Fine Arts Pavilion on the grounds of Century 21, the 1962 Seattle World's Fair, was the site of a half-dozen distinct art exhibits during the fair's six-month run between April 21 and October 21. Those exhibits were Masterpieces of Art; The Paintings of Mark Tobey; Art Since 1950: American; Art Since 1950: International; Art of the Ancient East; and Northwest Coast Indian Art. The latter exhibit -- curated by University of Washington anthropologist (and director of the Washington State Museum) Dr. Erna Gunther (1896-1982) -- offered attendees unprecedented exposure to the wondrous beauty of various Northwest Coast native people's unique artwork. Its very inclusion, and its adjacency to the other exhibits, was quite purposeful: A guidebook produced to accompany the exhibit explained that "The artwork of the Indians of the Northwest Coast is presented here with examples of the great arts of the world, both historic and contemporary" -- a remarkable premise insisting that this provincial art was worth knowing about and that it had artistic merit and cultural value akin to far-better-known pieces produced in other places and times (Gunther, exhibit guide).
File 9238: Full Text >

Chase, Doris Totten (1923-2008), Painter, Sculptor, Video Artist

Doris Chase, painter and teacher, sculptor of monumental kinetic forms, was best known as a pioneer in quite another field. Beginning in the 1970s, she produced more than 50 videos regarded as key works in the history of video art. This biography of Doris Chase is reprinted from Deloris Tarzan Ament's Iridescent Light: The Emergence of Northwest Art (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2002). Doris Chase died in December 2008.
File 5330: Full Text >

Chihuly, Dale (b. 1941), Visual Artist

Dale Chihuly is unquestionably the most famous living visual artist in the Northwest. His influence is international in scope and his reputation extends into several important areas, those of artist, teacher, designer, and co-founder of one of the world's most eminent glass schools, Pilchuck, located 50 miles north of Seattle in Stanwood (Snohomish County). Chihuly's work, like that other important sculptors such as England's Henry Moore (1898-1986) and America's David Smith (1906-1965), is immediately recognizable, even to those not schooled in the fine arts. Despite his legions of imitators, his work retains the signature quality and excitement that has manifested in the numerous series and installations of his illustrious career. For his "indelible contributions to the local community and world at large through his art," the Seattle-King County Association of Realtors named Dale Chihuly First Citizen of 2006.
File 7754: Full Text >

Cumming, William (1917-2010), Painter

William Cumming, a leading artist in the Pacific Northwest School, called himself "The Willie Nelson of Northwest Painting." His brilliant career as a painter was interwined with politics and interrupted by tuberculosis, only to re-emerge into a mainstream of recognition and renewed productivity. This biography of William Cumming is reprinted from Deloris Tarzan Ament's Iridescent Light: The Emergence of Northwest Art (Seattle: University of Washington Press, 2002). Note: All quotations, unless otherwise noted, are from Deloris Tarzan Ament's interview with William Cumming on December 8, 1999. William Cumming died on November 22, 2010.
File 5221: Full Text >

Curtis, Asahel (1874-1941), Photographer

The Seattle-based photographer Asahel Curtis made 60,000 photographic images over a 44-year career.They provide a remarkable visual record of the Pacific Northwest. He was the brother of the renowned photographer Edward Curtis; the brothers had a falling out when they were in their 20s, and never reconciled. As photography aesthetics have changed, Asahel's photographic legacy has grown in stature and now his place among the greats seems secure.
File 8780: Full Text >

Curtis, Edward S. (1868-1952), Photographer

Edward Curtis was one of the most prominent figures in the cultural history of Washington state. He is acknowledged as one of the leading American photographers of his time and has produced iconic portraits of many important historical figures such as Chief Joseph, J. P. Morgan, and President Theodore Roosevelt, who was among his most ardent supporters. Best known today for his epic 20-volume book, The North American Indian, Curtis also served as Seattle's finest commercial and portrait photographer in the early twentieth century. His studio became a nexus for important figures when anyone of prominence visiting Seattle made it a point to be photographed by the famed master. His studio was also the starting ground for several regional photographers who would go on to establish international reputations in their own right. These included Imogen Cunningham, Ella McBride, and Frank Asakichi Kunishige. Asahel Curtis, Edward's brother also became a noted photographer who concentrated on commercial landscape and documentary photography as well as poetic studies of Mt. Rainier.
File 8857: Full Text >

Dusanne, Zoe (1884-1972), Modern-art Dealer

Zoe Dusanne, Seattle's first professional modern-art dealer, introduced modern art to many residents of the Puget Sound region, and helped to catalyze the rise and international fame of the Northwest School of artists. In November 1950, Dusanne opened her home at 1303 Lakeview Place as the Zoe Dusanne Gallery. (The gallery overlooked Lake Union above the City Light power plant on Eastlake.) Seattle's first privately owned art gallery exhibited works (owned by Dusanne) by Paul Klee, Wassily Kandinsky, Fernand Leger, Hans (Jean) Arp, Piet Mondrian, and Giorgio de Chirico, as well as increasingly well known Northwest artists such as Mark Tobey (1890-1976), Guy Anderson (1906-1998), Kenneth Callahan (1905-1986), Paul Horiuchi (1906-1999), and George Tsutakawa (1910-1997). Zoe (Graves) Dusanne was African American, a founder along with her parents (Henry and Leticia Graves) of the Seattle chapter of the NAACP. She is considered to have exerted a major cultural influence on Seattle and the surrounding area.
File 5222: Full Text >

Filmography in Seattle

Since the 1933 debut of Tugboat Annie, Seattle has been featured in more than 100 motion pictures and television features. Generations of Hollywood producers have used Seattle-area scenery and architecture as backdrops of such major releases as The Slender Thread, It Happened at the World's Fair, The Parallax View, McQ, Cinderella Liberty, Sleepless in Seattle, The Fabulous Baker Boys, War Games, Trouble in Mind, Singles, and Little Buddha. Local actors and extras have also shared the spotlight with film stars including Wallace Beery, Marie Dressler, Sidney Poitier, Anne Bancroft, Walter Pidgeon, James Coburn, Warren Beatty, James Caan, Marsha Mason, Beau and Jeff Bridges, Michelle Pfeiffer, Tom Hanks, and Meg Ryan.
File 3678: Full Text >

Finley, Randy (b. 1942)

Randy Finley -- who became known to a generation of Seattle moviegoers for his long black beard, a habit of wearing an army jacket with his name sewn on it, and his innate ability to generate hype -- built the Seven Gables Corp. into the Northwest's largest chain of independent movie theaters.
File 7275: Full Text >

Contains Audio/Video

Foster, Donald Isle (1925-2012)

The great-grandson of Oregon Trail emigrants, Donald Isle Foster hails from a solid line of Pacific Northwest pioneers. He first came to prominence in the business community as the Director of Exhibits for Seattle's 1962 World's Fair (the Century 21 Exposition). Later he earned a reputation as one of the town's consummate aesthetes and a pillar of the local arts establishment during his 30 years with the taste-making Foster / White Gallery in Seattle's Pioneer Square neighborhood. Along the way, Foster fostered the careers of many of the Northwest's finest artists and he also benefited the community by serving on high-profile posts with the Seattle Symphony board, the Seattle Repertory Theater board, and the guiding committee of the Seattle Art Museum. (Note: This essay benefits greatly from extensive quotes taken from a recorded interview with Foster conducted in 2010 by Kathrine Beck and C. David Hughbanks.) Donald Foster died on March 24, 2012, in Palm Springs, California, survived by his longtime partner, Terry Arnett.
File 9618: Full Text >

Frye Art Museum (Seattle)

The Frye Art Museum -- once dismissed as a sensibly shod maiden aunt muddling along in the stiletto-heeled art world -- has entered middle age with a new sense of style and self-confidence. Celebrating its 50th anniversary in 2002, the museum boasts an award-winning makeover, new leadership, and an endowment that makes it the envy of its peers. The "old girl on Pill Hill" (at 704 Terry Avenue) is now "a chic young heiress whom everyone will want to date" (Art Guide Northwest, 1998).
File 3711: Full Text >

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Showing 1 - 20 of 33 results

Artist Gustavus Sohon documents the Walla Walla treaty council in May, 1855.

In May 1855, Gustavus Sohon (1825-1903) documents important scenes at the Walla Walla treaty council conducted by Governor Isaac Stevens (1818-1862) and General Joel Palmer, the Superintendents of Indian Affairs for Washington Territory and Oregon Territory. Sohon also sketches portraits of key figures at the council, including members of the Cayuse, Nez Perce, Palus, Umatilla, Walla Walla, and Yakama tribes. Sohon arrived on the Columbia River in 1852 as a private in the U.S. Army, and during the following decade, accompanied four expeditions across Eastern Washington. A man of many talents, Sohon serves as a guide, an interpreter, an explorer, and a cartographer, but he is best known as a self-taught artist whose surviving pencil sketches and watercolors of important figures and landmarks comprise valuable eyewitness records of a crucial transitional period in Inland Northwest history.
File 8595: Full Text >

Artist Gustavus Sohon sketches a panoramic view of the Battle of Spokane Plains on September 5, 1858.

On September 5, 1858, artist Gustavus Sohon (1825-1903) sketches a panoramic view of the Battle of Spokane Plains between the U.S. Army troops of Colonel George Wright (1803-1865) and a force of Spokane, Coeur d'Alene, and Palus tribesmen. Sohon arrived on the Columbia River in 1852 as a private in the U.S. Army, and during the following decade, accompanied four expeditions across Eastern Washington. A man of many talents, Sohon serves as a guide, an interpreter, an explorer, and a cartographer, but he is best known as a self-taught artist whose surviving pencil sketches and watercolors of important figures and landmarks comprise valuable eyewitness records of a crucial transitional period in Inland Northwest history.
File 8596: Full Text >

Frank Matsura arrives in and begins photographing Okanogan County in 1903.

In 1903, Frank Matsura (1874?-1913), a photographer from Japan, arrives in Conconully, Okanogan County. He begins photographing the scenes, inhabitants, and events of the region while working as a cook's helper in a hotel, and soon becomes a well-known and well-liked resident. By 1907, he opens a photograph studio in the newly incorporated city of Okanogan. The many photographs he makes until his untimely death in 1913 are significant both artistically and historically, providing a unique record of a time of transition on the Washington frontier.
File 5357: Full Text >

Statue of William H. Seward is unveiled at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition on September 10, 1909.

On September 10, 1909, the William H. Seward statue is unveiled at the Alaska-Yukon Pacific Exposition in Seattle. Sculpted by Richard E. Brooks (1865-1919), the statue honors New York Senator and Secretary of State William Seward (1801-1872), who advocated for the United States purchase of Alaska from Russia. After the A-Y-P Exposition ends, the statue is moved to Seattle's Volunteer Park.
File 8195: Full Text >

Photographer Imogen Cunningham opens her first portrait studio in Seattle in September 1910.

In September 1910, the photographer Imogen Cunningham (1883-1976) opens her first portrait studio at 1117 Terry Avenue on Seattle's First Hill. Cunningham, one of the foremost photographers of the twentieth century, grew up in Port Angeles and Seattle. She spent most of her career in San Francisco, but maintained life-long ties to the Puget Sound area.
File 5220: Full Text >

Sacagawea statue is unveiled at the State Normal School at Cheney on June 9, 1916.

On June 9, 1916, the class of 1916 of the State Normal School at Cheney donates a statue of Sacagawea. The statue will become an important school symbol. In the fall of 1960, a new modern statue will replace it, but the original will be re-installed in 2001. During those years the State Normal School at Cheney will become Eastern Washington College of Education (1937), Eastern Washington State College (1960), and finally, Eastern Washington University (1977).
File 8296: Full Text >

Painter Mark Tobey moves to Seattle in 1923.

In 1923, the painter Mark Tobey (1890-1976) moves to Seattle. Tobey will emerge as a leading painter of the Northwest School, the first to become internationally known.
File 3893: Full Text >

Henry Art Gallery opens in Seattle in February 1927.

In February 1927, the Henry Art Gallery, the first public art museum in the state of Washington, is founded in Seattle. Horace C. Henry (1844-1928), a collector, philanthropist, and builder, founds the museum and donates the funds to the University of Washington to construct the original building, which is designed by architect Carl Gould (1873-1939).
File 3841: Full Text >

Seattle Art Museum opens in Volunteer Park on June 23, 1933.

On June 23, 1933, the Seattle Art Museum opens in Volunteer Park as the result of a gift to the City of Seattle from Richard E. Fuller (1897-1976), president of the Art Institute of Seattle, and his mother Margaret (MacTavish) Fuller (1860-1953). The Fullers paid for the building and the City provided maintenance and utilities. The Art Institute of Seattle managed art activities. In December 1991, when the Seattle Art Museum opens in downtown Seattle, this museum will become the Seattle Asian Art Museum.
File 2082: Full Text >

Mark Tobey paints the first of his influential white-writing style paintings in November or December 1935.

In November or December 1935, the painter Mark Tobey (1890-1976) paints his first "white-writing" style paintings. Tobey, who moved to Seattle in 1923, is in England at the time, teaching at Dartington Hall in Devon. In the innovative paintings, he attempts to capture the frenetic energy he has experienced in New York City. The "white writing" paintings ultimately become an important influence in the development of Abstract Expressionism, especially on the work of Jackson Pollock. Mark Tobey returns to Seattle, and emerges as a leading painter of the Northwest School. He is the first to become internationally known.
File 3894: Full Text >

Bellevue's Pacific Northwest Arts Fair begins in 1947.

In 1947, Bellevue's Pacific Northwest Arts Fair opens for the first time. The three-day fair attracts some 300,000 visitors annually.
File 2888: Full Text >

Zoe Dusanne opens Seattle's first professional modern-art gallery on November 12, 1950.

On November 12, 1950, Zoe Dusanne (1884-1972) opens Seattle's first professional modern-art gallery. The gallery is located in Dusanne's specially designed home at 1303 Lakeview Place (overlooking Lake Union above the City Light gas plant on Eastlake) and is known as the Zoe Dusanne Gallery. The first exhibition features works by Guy Anderson, Virginia Banks, Kenneth Callahan, Edwin Danielson, Walter Isaacs, Patricia K. Nicholson, Ambrose Patterson, Viola Patterson, and Mark Tobey.
File 3863: Full Text >

Life magazine sheds limelight on Northwest School painters on September 28, 1953.

On September 28, 1953, Life publishes an article titled "Mystic Painters of the Northwest" that catapults the painters Guy Anderson (1906-1998), Kenneth Callahan (1906-1986), Mark Tobey (1890-1976), and Morris Graves (1910-2001) into the national limelight. A key figure in obtaining this attention is the Seattle collector and gallery owner Zoƫ Dusanne (1884-1972). After this breakthrough publicity, the Northwest School is recognized around the country.
File 5342: Full Text >

Congress of the Arts forms Allied Arts of Seattle on October 3, 1954.

On October 3, 1954, the Congress of the Arts forms Allied Arts of Seattle. The Congress had been convened by a small circle of academics, architects, and artists who had been meeting since 1952 as the Beer and Culture Society. The purpose of Allied Arts is to advocate for public funding of the arts, better urban planning and architecture, and other civic improvements. Allied Arts of Seattle will become one of the city's most influential advocates for urban design and the arts.
File 3203: Full Text >

PONCHO holds inaugural fundraising auction, to benefit Seattle Symphony, on April 27, 1963.

On the evening of April 27, 1963, PONCHO (Patrons of Northwest Civic, Cultural and Charitable Organizations) sponsor the organization's inaugural event at the Seattle Center's Exhibition Hall.
File 3892: Full Text >

First black film festival in Seattle opens on November 28, 1968.

On November 28, 1968, Seattle's first Black Film Festival opens for a four-day run. More or less organized as a fundraising event, the festival is designed to benefit a proposed filmmaker's workshop through CAMP, the Central Area Motivation Project. Two complete shows are held each evening, at 7 and 9:30 p.m., at CAMP headquarters, located at 722 18th Avenue. Tickets are $1 at the door.
File 1584: Full Text >

The L. T. Murrays present Tacoma Art Museum with a downtown building in 1971.

In 1971, the L. T. Murray family (owners of the Northwest timber firm Murray Pacific) presents the Tacoma Art Museum with an elegant three-story building at 12th Street and Pacific Avenue. Built in 1922, the building at 1123 Pacific Avenue was formerly the National Bank of Tacoma, and provides a secure structure to house precious artworks.
File 5135: Full Text >

Metamorfosis: The Journal of Northwest Chicano Art and Culture appears for the first time on May 13, 1977.

On May 13, 1977, the journal Metamorfosis appears for the first time. It is produced out of El Centro de Estudios Chicanos (Center for Chicano Studies) at the University of Washington, and becomes an essential cultural component of the Chicano movement in Washington. Though it will last only from 1977 to 1984, Metamorfosis becomes instrumental in providing a forum for academic work on Chicano/Latino arts and culture in the Northwest during a period when the movement at the national level was beginning to wane. The journal was especially important considering the relative isolation of Seattle from the Chicano cultural hubs of the Southwest.
File 8294: Full Text >

Seattle Art Museum's Hammering Man falls on September 28, 1991.

On September 28, 1991, Hammering Man, a 48-foot-tall metal sculpture created by Jonathan Borofsky for the entrance to the new Seattle Art Museum, falls and is damaged. The 22,000-pound steel and aluminum figure is being hoisted into place by a crane when a lift-strap breaks. The sculpture falls just one foot, but has to be returned to its foundry in Connecticut for repair.
File 3541: Full Text >

Seattle Art Museum opens downtown on December 5, 1991.

On December 5, 1991, the Seattle Art Museum opens downtown at 1st Avenue and University Street. The $64 million structure has 155,000 square feet, four times the space of the old museum at Volunteer Park. New galleries display African art, Northwest Native American art, modern art, photography, and Northwest artists.
File 3540: Full Text >

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Showing 1 - 7 of 7 results

Masters of Northwest Art -- Richard Fuller, Uncrowned King of Visual Art

Thelma Lehmann, Seattle painter and arts connoisseur, recounts her friendship with internationally respected art collector and patron Richard E. Fuller (1897-1976), and she describes his founding of the Seattle Art Museum at Volunteer Park (which now houses the Seattle Asian Arts Museum) in the early 1930s. As then president of the Seattle Art Institute, Richard Fuller, Ph.D., drafted plans with architect Carl F. Gould (1873-1939) for an art museum for Seattle and funded it with money inherited from his father. He took no salary as the Museum President and Director, and Thelma describes his sensitive administration of the Museum as a patron who was completely in touch with the arts community at the time. Reprinted with permission from Out of the Cultural Dustbin (Seattle: Hans and Thelma Lehmann, 1992).
File 3607: Full Text >

Masters of Northwest Art: Guy Anderson -- Master of the Northwest Spirit

Thelma Lehmann, Seattle painter and arts connoisseur, recalls a lunch meeting with Guy Anderson (1906-1998), a Northwest painter and member of the "Northwest Mystic" School including Mark Tobey (1890-1976), Kenneth Callahan (1905-1986), and Morris Graves (1911-2001). Guy described these artists' similar styles and influences on each other. Reprinted with permission from Out of the Cultural Dustbin (Seattle: Hans and Thelma Lehmann, 1992).
File 3612: Full Text >

Masters of Northwest Art: Kenneth Callahan -- A Creative Mix of Family and Art

Seattle painter and arts connoisseur Thelma Lehmann describes painter Kenneth Callahan (1905-1986), one of the four "Northwest Mystic" artists, and a close personal friend. This group of painters included Mark Tobey (1890-1976), Morris Graves (1911-2001), and Guy Anderson (1906-1998). Reprinted with permission from Out of the Cultural Dustbin (Seattle: Hans and Thelma Lehmann, 1992).
File 3616: Full Text >

Masters of Northwest Art: Mark Tobey -- Guru of Seattle Painters

Thelma Lehmann, Seattle painter and arts connoisseur, describes Mark Tobey (1890-1976), whom she calls the most visionary of the four "Northwest Mystic" painters. She describes him as petulant and querulous, but also noble and wise, even when confronted with an unbalanced groupie who claimed she was his wife. Reprinted with permission from Out of the Cultural Dustbin (Seattle: Hans and Thelma Lehmann, 1992).
File 3617: Full Text >

Masters of Northwest Art: Morris Graves -- Serious Art, Insouciant Antics

Seattle painter and arts connoisseur Thelma Lehmann describes some of the surprising public antics of famed "Northwest Mystic" painter Morris Graves (1911-2001), a friend and colleague. From Graves' public dispute with fellow artist Kenneth Callahan (1905-1986) in The Seattle Times "Letters to the Editor" section, to his forcible removal for outbursts during a performance by composer John Cage (1912-1992) at the Cornish School of the Arts, Graves never repressed his volatile and eccentric "artistic temperament." Reprinted with permission from Out of the Cultural Dustbin (Seattle: Hans and Thelma Lehmann, 1992).
File 3603: Full Text >

Stangle, Jack Warren (1927-1980) -- Northwest artist

Betty (Batchelor) Miles of Samish Island contributed this piece on Jack W. Stangle, who was a celebrated artist in Seattle from 1953 to his death in 1980. He was a member of the Northwest School and he garnered accolades for his bold oil painting as well as his ethereal tempuras and collages. He was the youngest artist to receive the Seattle Art Museum's annual award for artists under 40. Betty Miles was Stangle's companion for 10 years and a witness to many of his critical triumphs.
File 7687: Full Text >

Tsutakawa, George (1910-1997)

This biography of George Tsutakawa, the eminent Seattle painter, sculptor, and fountain maker, was written by his daughter, Mayumi Tsutakawa.
File 3088: Full Text >

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