Jimi Hendrix Clara McCarty Captain Robert Gray Anna Louise StrongAnna Louise Strong Bailey Gatzert Home WWII Women Pilots
Search Encyclopedia
Facebook
Advanced Search
Featured Eassy Sponsor of the Week Book Store Donate Now
Home About Us Contact Us Education Bookstore Tourism Advanced Search
6854 HistoryLink.org essays now available      
Donate Subscribe

Shortcuts

Libraries
Cyberpedias Cyberpedias
Timeline Essays Timeline Essays
People's Histories People's Histories

Selected Collections
Cities & Towns Cities & Towns
County Thumbnails Counties
Biographies Biographies
Interactive Cybertours Interactive Cybertours
Slide Shows Slideshows
Public Ports Public Ports
Audio & Video Audio & Video

Research Shortcuts

Map Searches
Alphabetical Search
Timeline Date Search
Topic Search

Features

Book of the Fortnight
Audio/Video Enhanced
History Bookshelf
Klondike Gold Rush Database
Duvall Newspaper Index
Wellington Scrapbook

More History

Washington FAQs
Washington Milestones
Honor Rolls
Columbia Basin
Everett
Olympia
Seattle
Spokane
Tacoma
Walla Walla
Roads & Rails

Library Search Results: Abstracts

Your search for LewisAndClark found 12 files.
To read complete essay, click title or image, or click "Full Text" link below abstract.

Show 10 20 40 results per page | < Show previous 20 | Show Next 20 >
Cyberpedias & Features (Alphabetical)
Timelines (Chronological)
People's Histories

Showing 1 - 2 of 2 results

Lewis and Clark Expedition in Washington, 1805-1806: An Illustrated Cybertour

An illustrated cybertour of the Lewis and Clark Expedition in what is now the state of Washington. The Corps of Volunteers for Northwest Discovery (as the expedition was formally named) entered the area of the future state in October 1805. The cybertour was written and curated by Cassandra Tate, with photos by Glenn Drosendahl.
File 7062: Full Text >

Lewis and Clark in Washington

In May 1803, the United States purchased Louisiana from France. The doubling of U.S. territory caused President Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826) to send Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809) on a westward expedition to explore the nation's new piece of real estate. The Corps of Discovery was a party of 33 people, including Sacagawea, a Shohone Indian, and York, an African slave. The Corps, under the leadership of Captain Lewis and Captain William Clark (1770-1838), traveled by foot, horse, and watercraft across North America and back again beginning in Wood River, Illinois, in May 1804, and returning to St. Louis, Missouri, in August 1806. The period the Corps spent along the Columbia and Snake rivers and at the mouth of the Columbia -- from October 1805 to May 1806 -- was principally within what is now the State of Washington.
File 5556: Full Text >

Showing 1 - 10 of 10 results

The United States signs the Louisiana Purchase Treaty and buys Louisiana Territory from France on May 2, 1803.

On May 2, 1803, the United States and France sign the Louisiana Purchase Treaty, (which was antedated to April 30, 1803). With the stroke of a pen, the United States, a new and rather small nation, doubles in size, adding nearly 828,000 square miles -- an enormous swath of land that stretches across the entire central portion of present-day United States. France sells the land "for a song" -- about four cents an acre. The Louisiana Purchase is the achievement of America's third president, Thomas Jefferson (1743-1826). Jefferson had already planned the Lewis and Clark Expedition to explore the vast, unknown land west of the Missouri River, much of which had belonged to France. By the time the Louisiana Purchase is announced to the tiny nation on July 3, 1803, Meriwether Lewis is already on his way to Pittsburgh to obtain supplies for the historic journey, which will now proceed across lands belonging to the United States.
File 5706: Full Text >

Lewis and Clark Expedition enters future state of Washington on October 10, 1805.

On October 10, 1805, Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Volunteers for Northwestern Discovery enter what is now the state of Washington, at the confluence of what they call the "Koos koos ke" (Clearwater River) and the "Kimooenem" or "Lewis's River" (Snake).
File 5323: Full Text >

Lewis and Clark reach the confluence of the Snake and Columbia rivers on October 16, 1805.

On October 16, 1805, the Lewis and Clark Expedition reaches the confluence of the Snake and Columbia rivers at present-day Pasco, beginning the final leg of 4,000-mile journey of exploration from St. Louis, Missouri, to the Pacific Ocean.
File 5337: Full Text >

Lewis and Clark begin descending the rapids of the Columbia River at Celilo Falls on October 22, 1805.

On October 22, 1805, Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Discovery encounter Celilo Falls, at the beginning of a 55-mile stretch of the Columbia River that will prove to be the most difficult and dangerous part of their journey through the Pacific Northwest.
File 5355: Full Text >

Lewis and Clark camp near Salmon Creek in Clark County on November 4, 1805.

On November 4, 1805, the Corps of Discovery led by Meriwether Lewis (1774-1809) and William Clark (1770-1838) camps on the Columbia River in what is now Clark County, beside a Chinookan Indian house near the entrance of Salmon Creek. The expedition has come nearly 4,000 miles from the mouth of the Missouri River, and is nearing its goal -- the Pacific Ocean at the mouth of the Columbia River.
File 5174: Full Text >

Lewis and Clark prematurely celebrate their arrival at the Pacific Ocean on November 7, 1805.

On November 7, 1805, thinking he can see and hear the Pacific Ocean in the distance, William Clark writes his most famous journal entry: "Great joy in camp we are in view of the Ocian, this great Pacific Octean which we have been so long anxious to See." In fact, the Lewis and Clark Expedition is still 20 miles from the sea.
File 5360: Full Text >

Lewis and Clark Expedition reaches the Pacific Ocean on November 15, 1805.

On November 15, 1805, Lewis and Clark and the Corps of Volunteers for Northwestern Discovery reach the Pacific Ocean at the mouth of the Columbia River, one year, six months, and one day after leaving St. Louis, Missouri, in search of the legendary "Northwest Passage" to the sea.
File 5383: Full Text >

In first election by Americans in the West, the Corps of Discovery votes to winter on the south side of the Columbia River on November 24, 1805.

On November 24, 1805, the Corps of Discovery, led by Captains Meriwether Lewis and William Clark, votes to spend the winter on the south bank of the Columbia River. All members of the expedition are allowed to participate. This is the first election by Americans in the West, and the first election to include a woman, a Native American, and an African slave.
File 7539: Full Text >

Homeward bound, the Lewis and Clark Expedition leaves future state of Washington on May 5, 1806.

On May 5, 1806, after taking an overland shortcut from present-day Wallula to the vicinity of Clarkston, the Lewis and Clark Expedition leaves the confines of what is now the state of Washington. From here, the explorers will continue east, ending their 8,000-mile "voyage of discovery" in St. Louis, Missouri, four months later.
File 5398: Full Text >

Tri-Cities celebrates the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Expedition beginning on October 14, 2005.

From October 14 through 17, 2005, the Tri-Cities celebrates the bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Expedition. Meriwether Lewis and William Clark had explored the area 200 years before, in 1805. People from across the Columbia Basin celebrate the anniversary of that historic event at Sacajawea State Park, located in Pasco at the confluence of the Snake and Columbia rivers, and at Columbia Park in Kennewick. Descendants of the tribal peoples who greeted Lewis and Clark's Corps of Volunteers for Northwest Discovery join in and share their perspective.
File 7605: Full Text >

No Results

< Show previous 20 | Show Next 20 >
 
Home About Us Contact Us Education Bookstore Tourism Advanced Search

HistoryLink.org is the first online encyclopedia of local and state history created expressly for the Internet. (SM)
HistoryLink.org is a free public and educational resource produced by History Ink, a 501 (c) (3) tax-exempt corporation.
Contact us by phone at 206.447.8140, by mail at Historylink, 1411 4th Ave. Suite 803, Seattle WA 98101 or email admin@historylink.org