Jimi Hendrix Clara McCarty Captain Robert Gray Anna Louise StrongAnna Louise Strong Bailey Gatzert Home WWII Women Pilots
Search Encyclopedia
Facebook
Advanced Search
Featured Eassy Sponsor of the Week Book Store Donate Now
Home About Us Contact Us Education Bookstore Tourism Advanced Search
6857 HistoryLink.org essays now available      
Donate Subscribe

Shortcuts

Libraries
Cyberpedias Cyberpedias
Timeline Essays Timeline Essays
People's Histories People's Histories

Selected Collections
Cities & Towns Cities & Towns
County Thumbnails Counties
Biographies Biographies
Interactive Cybertours Interactive Cybertours
Slide Shows Slideshows
Public Ports Public Ports
Audio & Video Audio & Video

Research Shortcuts

Map Searches
Alphabetical Search
Timeline Date Search
Topic Search

Features

Book of the Fortnight
Audio/Video Enhanced
History Bookshelf
Klondike Gold Rush Database
Duvall Newspaper Index
Wellington Scrapbook

More History

Washington FAQs
Washington Milestones
Honor Rolls
Columbia Basin
Everett
Olympia
Seattle
Spokane
Tacoma
Walla Walla
Roads & Rails

Library Search Results: Abstracts

Your search for ALYuPaEx found 96 files.
To read complete essay, click title or image, or click "Full Text" link below abstract.

Show 10 20 40 results per page | < Show previous 20 | Show Next 20 >
Cyberpedias & Features (Alphabetical)
Timelines (Chronological)
People's Histories

Showing 1 - 20 of 22 results

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909) -- A Cybertour of Selected Buildings

This is a "Now and Then" Cybertour of selected exhibit buildings at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, held in 1909 on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. The buildings included in the Cybertour include most of those funded by the federal government and by the four Washington counties (Chehalis, King, Spokane, and Yakima) that erected buildings at the fair. This tour also includes the Washington Building (an important gathering place for large receptions) and the New York Building (where most of the fair's important banquets were held). This tour was written by Alan Stein and Paula Becker with assistance from Jennifer Ott, and curated by Paula Becker. Map by Marie McCaffrey. Preparation of this feature was made possible by the Washington Humanities Commission.
File 8678: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Baby Incubator Exhibit and Cafe

Washington's first World's Fair -- the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition -- was held in Seattle on the grounds of the University of Washington campus between June 1 and October 16, 1909, and drew more than three million people. The Pay Streak was the A-Y-P Exposition's midway area. It offered (for a price) a dizzying array of carnival rides, souvenirs, refreshments, and quasi-educational exhibits. These last involved the display of human beings in varying degrees of their (purported) natural settings, going about what was supposedly their usual daily work. The Baby Incubator Exhibit, which introduced fairgoers to an early version of mechanical controlled environments for the benefit of premature infants, featured living human babies as the (passive) performers, demonstrating applied science in the nursery decades before such technology was commonly integrated into neonatal care in hospitals.
File 8921: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Chinese Village

The Chinese Village was built for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition in Seattle in 1909. The exposition took place between June 1 and October 16, 1909, drawing more than three million people. Visitors came from around the state, the nation, and the world to view hundreds of educational exhibits, stroll the lushly manicured grounds, and be entertained on the Pay Streak midway, while Seattle promoted itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia. The development and management of the Chinese Village was handled by Ah King (1863-1915), a successful Chinese merchant in Seattle. It was located in the northern part of the Pay Streak, right next to the Ferris wheel, and featured three buildings, including a Chinese temple, a restaurant, and a theater with acts that changed daily.
File 8964: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Committees

The 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition was held in Seattle on the University of Washington campus from June 1 to October 16. This was Washington's first world's fair and it celebrated 12 years of prosperity -- since the 1897 Alaska Gold Rush -- through the display of resources, products, and advantages of Washington and the region. More than three million people visited the fair from Washington cities and counties and from the rest of the country. Planning, funding, and producing the A-Y-P Exposition required the talents of many civic leaders. Many of these leaders served on the committees of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition Corporation. The Alaska-Yukon Exposition Corporation was formed May 8, 1906. On May 31, 1906, the word "Pacific" was added to the corporation's name. What follows is a list of the committees of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Corporation, as enumerated in the Secretary's Report of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (Seattle: Gateway Printing, 1911). Birth/death dates were added by the HistoryLink.org staff in 2012.
File 8630: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Hoo-Hoo House

The Hoo-Hoo House was built by the Hoo-Hoo, a lumberman's fraternity, for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition in Seattle in 1909. The exposition took place between June 1 and October 16, 1909, drawing more than three million people. Visitors came from around the state, the nation, and the world to view hundreds of educational exhibits, stroll the lushly manicured grounds, and be entertained on the Pay Streak midway, while Seattle promoted itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia. The Hoo-Hoo House was open to Hoo-Hoo members and lumbermen during the exposition. The house was particularly known for its two large ornamental cats in front of the building with green electric eyes which shone brightly at night. After the exposition ended, the building served as the University of Washington Faculty Club until it was demolished in 1959.
File 8655: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Music at the Fair

Washington's first World's Fair -- the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition -- was held in Seattle on the grounds of the University of Washington campus between June 1 and October 16, 1909, and drew more than three million people. Visitors came from far and wide to be entertained while Seattle promoted itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia. Among the many attractions were musical performances -- parades, dances, and concerts in the Auditorium, Amphitheatre, Music Pavilion, and central bandstand -- by a wide variety of entertainers representing various towns in the region, states in the union, and nations of the world. Included in the offerings were the exotic sounds of various foreign music traditions, big-time bands from Chicago and New York, a down-home southern vaudeville revue, and numerous local ensembles from Tacoma, Spokane, Yakima, Long Beach, and homegrown headliners from Seattle.
File 8876: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Pay Streak Amusements

The 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition was held in Seattle on the University of Washington campus from June 1 to October 16. This was Washington's first world's fair and it celebrated 12 years of prosperity -- since the 1897 Alaska Gold Rush -- through the display of resources, products, and advantages of Washington and the region. More than three million people visited the fair from Washington cities and counties and from the rest of the country. The Pay Streak was the A-Y-P Exposition's midway area. It offered (for a price) a dizzying array of carnival rides, quasi-educational exhibits, souvenirs, and refreshments. It was a magnet for fairgoers of all ages. This file contains a list of the A-Y-P Exposition's gross receipts and exposition revenue generated by amusements, restaurants, and merchandise concessions during the course of the fair, as enumerated in the Secretary's Report of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (Seattle: Gateway Printing, 1911). Most, but not all, of these businesses were located on or near the Pay Streak. Some businesses operated for only a few weeks. Others operated throughout the course of the fair. This list excludes revenue generated within exhibit buildings.
File 8635: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Special Days

The 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition was held in Seattle on the University of Washington campus from June 1 to October 16. This was Washington's first world's fair and it celebrated 12 years of prosperity -- since the 1897 Alaska Gold Rush -- through the display of resources, products, and advantages of Washington and the region. More than three million people visited the fair from Washington cities and counties and from the rest of the country. Throughout the exposition, commemorative days were set aside to honor organizations, professions, and ethnic communities, as well as visitors from various cities, counties, and states. Some of these commemorations included banquets, conferences, or other forms of special recognition given to the groups being honored. Because these events were so popular with fairgoers, A-Y-P promoters kept adding new commemorative days as the fair progressed. Thus, some days had mulitple honorees.This file contains a list of all A-Y-P commemorative days as reported in The Seattle Daily Times, The Seattle Sunday Times, and the Seattle Post-Intelligencer.
File 8461: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): The Olmsted Legacy

The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition was held in Seattle at the University of Washington campus from June 1 to October 16, 1909. Planning for its extensive landscaped grounds and many buildings began several years before opening day. In October 1906, the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition Company hired landscape architect John C. Olmsted (1852-1920) of the prestigious Olmsted Brothers firm of Brookline, Massachusetts, to design the grounds. The A-Y-P Exposition Company leased the southern portion of campus where the forest had been cut over once, but where second-growth trees and dense underbrush covered the slope from about 41st Street to the lakeshore. Olmsted developed a plan that would serve the needs of the fair as well as those of the university after the exposition ended. His plan differed from other world's fair plans in that it relied on the natural scenery, including Mount Rainier and Lake Washington and Lake Union, for focal points around which he laid out the buildings, roads, and paths. By the time of the fair's opening in 1909, gardeners had transformed the forest into a park with avenues, paths, cascading water emptying into the Geyser Basin (now Drumheller Fountain), buildings, and beautiful vistas looking out onto Seattle's distinctive natural surroundings. A hundred years later, elements of the Olmsted design remain as legacies of the exposition.
File 8873: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition (1909): Woman Suffrage

During the first week of July 1909, suffrage proponents from across the country gathered in Seattle to participate in the 41st Annual Convention of the National American Woman Suffrage Association and to celebrate Woman Suffrage Day at Washington's first world's fair, the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, currently underway on the University of Washington campus. The Washington Equal Suffrage Association convention, held the day before the National convention, drew suffragists from around the state. The suffragists, their conventions, and their appearances in area clubs and churches received copious coverage in local newspapers and captured the attention of thousands of Washingtonians attending the A-Y-P Exposition. Suffragists used the A-Y-P as a massive public relations opportunity and this exposure was an important component in how Washington women achieved the vote on November 8, 1910.
File 8587: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, 1909 -- A Slideshow of Seattle's First World's Fair

This is a Slideshow on the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, Washington's first World's Fair, which opened on June 1, 1909, and closed on October 16, 1909. More than three million people visited the fair, which took place in Seattle on the University of Washington campus. Written and Curated by Paul Dorpat, with Chris Goodman. Presented by Safeco.
File 7082: Full Text >

Anderson, Otto (1857-1938), Furniture Designer and Guitar-Maker

The excellent wood-working skills of Swedish immigrant, Otto Edward Anderson provided him with good job opportunities upon his arrival in the Pacific Northwest in 1888. One highlight of his career must have been winning a gold award at Seattle's first world's fair -- the 1909 Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition -- for the innovative designs of some fine handcrafted furniture. But in hindsight, it seems that it was his years of making musical string instruments -- guitars, violins, and perhaps a mandolin -- and an association with the region's legendary instrument manufacturer, Chris J. Knutsen, which may bring him longer-lasting fame.
File 8916: Full Text >

Chealander, Godfrey (1868-1953)

Godfrey Chealander was the first to suggest that Seattle hold the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, the world's fair that in 1909 drew more than three million visitors. He came to the Northwest in 1894, just before the Klondike Gold Rush. An immigrant from Kalmar, Sweden, Chealander joined the hordes of miners who traveled north to the Yukon in 1897 upon hearing reports of gold strikes. Chealander went as a merchant, however, not a miner. He, his wife Mary (ca. 1871-1969), and twin two-year-old sons Byron (1894-1983) and Herbert (1894-1971) moved to Skagway, where Chealander set up a tobacco shop and confectionary. The family lived there for nine years, returning to Seattle in 1906 to help organize and promote the exposition. Chealander conceived of the idea while gathering objects for an exhibit about Alaska at the 1905 Lewis and Clark Exposition in Portland. In a later interview, he remembered that he was interested in an Alaska exposition because the Lewis and Clark Exposition exhibit, "hadn't half done justice to Alaska." Chealander enlisted the support of members of the Alaska Club and the Chamber of Commerce in Seattle and on June 1, 1909, the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition opened in Seattle. For about a decade Chealander participated in public life in Seattle, serving as a special commissioner for the A-Y-P and as a Civil Service Commission member in Seattle, and helping establish Swedish Hospital. He and his wife operated retail stores in Snohomish County before moving to Southern California in 1930. Chealander died in Los Angeles on December 4, 1953.
File 8847: Full Text >

Chilberg, John Edward (1867-1954)

John Edward "Ed" Chilberg, a prominent Seattle merchant and banker, was among the first to promote the idea of a grand world's fair in Washington state. He saw the opportunity to celebrate our Far Corner as a player in the nation's cultural and economic life. With his handsome profile and as president of The Alaska Club (later The Arctic Club), Chilberg was chosen president of a noisy and colorful 1909 Seattle milestone called the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition.
File 8753: Full Text >

Frolich, Finn Haakon (1868-1947), Sculptor

Finn Haakon Frolich served as Director of Sculpture for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition held in Seattle in 1909, and a colorful, engaging figure who enlivened many places around the world with his creativity and artistic inspirations. His legacy in Seattle includes two sculptures on the University of Washington campus remaining from the Exposition: the busts of Edvard Grieg and of James J. Hill busts, as well as the town of Beaux Arts.
File 8849: Full Text >

Goon Dip (ca.1862-1933).

Goon Dip was a phenomenon -- a visionary and wealthy entrepreneur, public servant, philanthropist, and the most influential Chinese in the Pacific Coast during the early years of the twentieth century. He had some luck, which he acknowledged and honored, but he also had to breach the virulent anti-Chinese wall of the times to attain success. And he did it with a high level of civility and compassion. One obituary eulogized: "He brought the innate courtesy, the kindly philosophy, the 'do unto others' doctrine common to all faiths into his daily life ..." (The Seattle Daily Times).
File 9026: Full Text >

Hawaiian Music and its Historic Seattle Connection

The distinctive music of the Hawaiian Islands is easily recognizable -- its signature thrumming of a 'ukulele, thwacking of bamboo percussion sticks (puili), and keening "steel guitar" lines are, today, universally associated with native hula dancing and festive luau feasts. But it was an international exotica "craze" that made those sounds so familiar -- and the city of Seattle played a significant role in sparking that remarkable fad during the earliest decades of the twentieth century.
File 8831: Full Text >

Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies

The Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies is a world-renowned research and educational center that traces its deep Seattle roots back a full century and through various incarnations -- each of which reflected the academic interests and political concerns of their times. Celebrating its centennial this year, the University of Washington-based school's origins date back to 1909 -- but it was in 1983 that it received a new name: one that saluted Washington State's longtime senior U.S. senator. By adopting that new honorific moniker, the organization's intent was to acknowledge the outstanding foreign affairs expertise displayed by Henry Martin Jackson (1912-1983) over his four-plus decades of public service, and his direct efforts to support the school's important work.
File 9005: Full Text >

Kerry, Albert Sperry (1866-1939)

Albert Kerry was a Northwest lumberman who was known for his business acumen in the lumber industry and for his civic involvement, especially in Seattle. Two towns (one in Oregon and one in Washington) where Kerry established lumber mills were named after him, and Kerry Park on Queen Anne Hill bears the Kerry name. He served as vice-president of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in 1909, and played a leading role in the financing and direction of the construction of the Olympic Hotel in downtown Seattle in 1924. A strikingly well-rounded man, Kerry also played a leading role in a number of other organizations and projects during his life.
File 8856: Full Text >

Sorrento Hotel (Seattle)

The Sorrento Hotel, located at the northwest corner of Madison Street and Terry Avenue on lower First Hill in Seattle, opened just in time for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition of 1909. Built by the Samuel Rosenberg Investment Company, the brick hotel was designed by architect Harlan Thomas (1870-1953) as a luxury hotel of seven stories in an eclectic Italianate style. Renowned until the end of the 1960s for its top-floor dining and lounge facilities with sweeping views of Elliott Bay and the Olympic Mountains, The Sorrento has served both visitors and local people for a century. The hotel was significantly restored and remodeled in 1981 by Michael Malone and Robert Burkheimer with Bumgardner Architects. Additional restoration and remodeling in 2002 has helped the Sorrento Hotel continue to be the only historic Seattle hotel to serve continuously as originally intended since it was built. By contemporary standards, the Sorrento was "unusual and fantastic," according to architectural historian Heather MacIntosh ("Thomas, Harlan ...").
File 8669: Full Text >

< Show previous 20 | Show Next 20 >

Showing 1 - 20 of 73 results

Washington State Legislature passes law prohibiting the sale of alcohol on the University of Washington campus in Seattle on March 19, 1895.

On March 19, 1895, the Washington State Legislature unanimously passes a law prohibiting the sale of alcohol on the University of Washington campus in Seattle and within two miles of the campus, with the exception of the Madison Park business district, which lies just at the edge of the two-mile radius. The bill passes unanimously and without controversy. In 1906 the issue will come under consideration again when the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition Company begins searching for a site for the world's fair to be held in 1909. The campus would provide a spectacular site with ample room, but one with a prohibition on selling alcohol. At a different site, the A-Y-P Exposition Company would receive substantial income from alcohol concessions. The company will decide to use the campus, much to the chagrin of some, and the fair will nevertheless make a profit during its run in 1909. In 2009, the sale of alcohol on the university campus remains limited to special events, although today it is the UW Board of Regents, not the legislature, that determines the school's alcohol policy.
File 8940: Full Text >

Alaska Club incorporates to promote Alaska on December 7, 1903.

On December 7, 1903, The Alaska Club incorporates with the object of promoting Alaska and its resources. Housed before long on the 15th floor of the new Alaska Building at 2nd Avenue and Cherry Street in downtown Seattle, the club offers a meeting room, a reading room, and an exhibit on Alaska in its reception area. The club also serves as an information bureau, publishing The Alaska Almanac annually. In 1908 the Alaska Club merges with the Arctic Club, a social organization of people from Alaska or connected with it through business. The new club, known as the Arctic Club, combines the social and business aspects of the two organizations. After 1914, the Arctic Building at 3rd Avenue and Cherry Street houses their offices and gathering rooms, including the famous Dome Room. The club disbands in 1971, most of its members having succumbed to old age, 74 years after the Gold Rush started.
File 8707: Full Text >

The Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition Company signs a lease with the UW Board of Regents providing for the A-Y-P to be sited on campus grounds on September 27, 1906.

On September 27, 1906, the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition Company signs a lease with the University of Washington Board of Regents, providing for the A-Y-P to be sited on campus grounds. The A-Y-P will be a world's fair to be held from June 1 to October 16, 1909. The Grounds and Buildings Committee of the A-Y-P Company considered other locations in the city, including Bailey Peninsula (now Seward Park), Mount Baker Park, Washington Park, and Magnolia. The university campus's hundreds of acres of undeveloped land, proximity to downtown Seattle, and spectacular views of mountains and lakes all factor into its selection. UW Professor Edmond S. Meany (1862-1935) strongly advocated for the campus site because of the university would gain buildings for student use and the forested acreage would be cleared and graded for future construction.
File 8966: Full Text >

Regents of the University of Washington approve John C. Olmsted's plan for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition on May 17, 1907.

On May 17, 1907, the University of Washington's Board of Regents approves the plan for the grounds of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, a world's fair to be held on campus from June 1 to October 16, 1909. John C. Olmsted (1852-1920) of the Olmsted Brothers landscape architecture firm had developed the plan over the previous several months. It would transform the forested campus into a park for the world's fair and into a future site for the growing university. Upon the regents' approval of the plan, a two-year frenzy of construction begins.
File 8939: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition groundbreaking ceremonies take place on June 1, 1907.

On June 1, 1907, Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition groundbreaking ceremonies are held at the south end of the University of Washington campus in Seattle. One hundred acres of old-growth Douglas firs are cut down for the fairgrounds.
File 692: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition landscaping crews put the finishing touches on a 20-acre nursery on October 1, 1907.

On October 1, 1907, Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition landscaping crews put the finishing touches on a 20-acre nursery for plants and sod in preparation for the spring of 1909, when they will need millions of plants to landscape the exposition grounds. John C. Olmsted (1852-1920) of the Olmsted Brothers landscape architecture firm designed the plan for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, a world's fair to be held at the University of Washington campus from June 1 to October 16, 1909. Olmsted's plan for the fair will transform the forested campus into a park replete with formal gardens, expanses of lawns, paths, avenues, millions of plants around buildings and in beds, and remnant forest. By the time the exposition opens, gardeners will have planted more than two million trees, perennials, and annuals around the grounds, including 10,000 rhododendrons, 5,000 roses, and 80,000 dwarf phlox.
File 8980: Full Text >

Grading crews finish work on the Rainier Vista (designed for Seattle's A-Y-P Exposition on the UW campus) on May 1, 1908.

On May 1, 1908, grading crews complete the sculpting of the Rainier Vista out of the forest and hills of Seattle's University of Washington campus in preparation for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, a world's fair to be held at the university campus from June 1 to October 16, 1909. Crews smoothed the rough ground into an even slope leading down to the lakeshores and then terraced part of the slope into a series of level plains on which to build the exposition's temporary and permanent buildings. They cut a web of avenues into the hillside to provide access to the fairgrounds, some of which continue to serve the university today. John C. Olmsted (1852-1920), a landscape architect and partner in the Olmsted Brothers firm that created Seattle's park and boulevard system and an earlier plan for the university campus, developed the landscape plan for the exposition. The regrading created the campus that has served the university for the past centur, both in the space it created for continued growth and in its beauty.
File 8982: Full Text >

Cornerstone of the governor's mansion in Olympia is laid on August 1, 1908.

On August 1, 1908, the cornerstone of the governor's mansion in Olympia is laid in a ceremony conducted by the Masonic Grand Lodge of the State of Washington. Royal A. Gove (1856-1951), Most Worshipful Grand Master, presides, together with State Treasurer George G. Mills. A copy of the program, a roster of state officials, copies of Olympia and Tacoma newspapers, and an Olympia Booster Book are among the items sealed within the cornerstone, which is made of Washington marble. Governor Albert E. Mead (1861-1913) witnesses the ceremony, along with several hundred other celebrants.
File 9039: Full Text >

Siberian Yupik arrive in Olympia en route to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition on September 27, 1908.

On September 27, 1908, six Siberian Yupik families disembark at Olympia on their way to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition. The exposition, Washington's first world's fair, is to be held on the University of Washington campus in Seattle from June to October 1909. Exhibits at the fair will highlight West Coast resources, agriculture, and manufacturing along with that of other countries around the Pacific Rim. Much of the entertainment will purport to educate visitors about the cultures of the Pacific, such as that of the people they called Eskimos.
File 8913: Full Text >

Washington Equal Suffrage Association publishes Washington Women's Cook Book in Seattle in late 1908.

In late 1908, the Washington Equal Suffrage Association publishes the Washington Women's Cook Book. The book, comprising recipes donated by suffragists from around the state, is planned as a fundraiser for the group and to carry the woman suffrage message into Washington homes. In February 1909 the Washington State Legislature agrees to place an equal suffrage amendment on the November 1910 ballot. The Washington Women's Cook Book is sold during the 1909-1910 suffrage campaign, including at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, becoming part of Washington suffragists' so-called "still hunt" strategy to win the support of male voters through the influence of their daughters, wives, and mothers.
File 8552: Full Text >

Seattle City Light installs an ornamental street lighting system in 1909.

In 1909, Seattle City Light installs an ornamental street lighting system in preparation for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. This improvement coincides with the extensive regrading of huge tracts of land in the commercial downtown and surrounding neighborhoods. The promise of thousands of visitors places the city's image in the forefront of city planning and budget decisions.
File 1724: Full Text >

Washington State Legislature, on February 10, 1909, tables a proposed bill that would have required visitors from Japan to the A-Y-P Exposition to post bond ensuring their return to Japan.

On February 10, 1909, both houses of the Washington State Legislature resolve to table proposed legislation requiring visitors from Japan who attend the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition to post a bond for their return to Japan. This is done at the request of Acting Governor Marion Hay (1865-1933), who had been contacted by Secretary of State Robert Bacon (1860-1919). Bacon sought to prevent any anti-Japanese bills from being introduced into the Legislature in order to preserve good relations with Japan's government.
File 9037: Full Text >

Railroad workers lay the last rail of the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound Railway's line at Snoqualmie Pass on March 29, 1909.

On March 29, 1909, railroad workers lay the last rail of the Chicago, Milwaukee & Puget Sound Railway's line (later named the Chicago, Milwaukee & St. Paul Railway) at Snoqualmie Pass, just in time to carry passengers from Eastern Washington to Seattle for the opening of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. Nearly four million fairgoers will visit the exposition, a world's fair located on the University of Washington campus that will run from June 1, 1909 to October 16, 1909. Fairgoers traveling to Seattle from around the state, country, and world, will mostly arrive by train or ship, since there are few roads crossing the mountains.
File 9090: Full Text >

UW hosts lecture by Rev. Herbert H. Gowen on May 11, 1909, to inaugurate new Department of Oriental Subjects.

On May 11, 1909 -- a mere three weeks prior to the Grand Opening on June 1, 1909 of Seattle's first World's Fair (the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, which was mounted on a portion of the current University of Washington campus) -- another historic event took place at the new Auditorium Building (later renamed: Meany Hall). UW faculty and senior students were summoned to attend an inaugural lecture by Reverend Herbert H. Gowen (1864-1960), the newly appointed Chair of the Department of Oriental History, Literature, and Institutions (or "Oriental Subjects"). This department will evolve to eventually (in 1983) become the Henry M. Jackson School of International Studies.
File 8999: Full Text >

Seattle races to complete infrastructural improvements needed for June opening of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in May 1909.

In May 1909, Seattle races to complete infrastructural improvements required for the upcoming opening of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition. On May 13, 1909, just 17 days until the opening, the Seattle Times front-page headline reads, "The Fair Will Be Ready, Will Seattle?" As the fair approaches, the city races to complete improvements in the Brooklyn neighborhood (later renamed University District) for the exposition and the crowds of visitors they anticipate. In time for the fair the city will complete a new sewer line, graded roads with curbs and sidewalks, two new double-track streetcar lines, and street lighting.
File 8774: Full Text >

Lettie Lee Rochester, age 14, receives the first season ticket to the A-Y-P Exposition, as reported on May 17, 1909.

On May 17, 1909, the Seattle Post-Intelligencer reports that 14-year-old Lettie (Letitia) Lee Rochester (later Lettie Lee Craig, 1894-1968), a student at Seattle's Lincoln High School, is to receive the first season ticket to the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition. She receives the souvenir coupon book as a reward for her studiousness. The fair's department of admissions had received many simultaneous applications this first season ticket. The problem of who should be so honored was solved a businessman purchased the coupon book, offering to give it to a school girl as a reward for her studiousness. Lettie Rochester, daughter of the late Judge Junius Rochester, is chosen. She has received an "excellent" in English, algebra, ancient history, Latin, and German, and dreams of being a lawyer. The exposition will open on June 1 and will draw more than three million visitors before it closes on October 16, 1909. Visitors from around the state, the nation, and the world will view hundreds of educational exhibits, stroll the lushly manicured grounds, and be entertained on the Pay Streak midway, while Seattle promotes itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia.
File 9196: Full Text >

Sorrento Hotel opens in Seattle on May 30, 1909.

On May 30, 1909, The Seattle Times lauds the newly opened Sorrento Hotel as a "credit to Seattle." The 150-room hotel opens just in time for the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, a world's fair that will open June 1st at the University of Washington campus. Designed by Harlan Thomas (1870-1953) for Samuel Rosenberg (1859-1915), a local clothing retailer, the luxury hotel includes design elements inspired by the Italian town for which it is named. In a city not far removed from its pioneer days, the Sorrento embodies the sense Seattleites have on the eve of the A-Y-P that Seattle has arrived on the world stage. The hotel remains open a hundred years later, its elegance rejuvenated by restoration work in the 1980s.
File 8797: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition opens in Seattle on June 1, 1909.

On June 1, 1909, close to 80,000 people attend opening day of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, held on the University of Washington campus in Seattle. The exposition took place between June 1 and October 16, 1909, drawing more than three million people. Visitors came from around the state, the nation, and the world to view hundreds of educational exhibits, stroll the lushly manicured grounds, and be entertained on the Pay Streak midway, while Seattle promoted itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia.
File 8965: Full Text >

University Boulevard, precursor to Seattle's Montlake Boulevard, opens on June 1, 1909.

On June 1, 1909, University Boulevard opens in Seattle between Washington Park Boulevard (now a portion of Lake Washington Boulevard) and the south entrance of the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition, the world's fair held on the University of Washington campus from June 1 to October 16, 1909. The boulevard is part of the design for scenic parks and drives made in 1903 by John C. Olmsted (1852-1920). Montlake Boulevard, as it is now known, is today a segment of State Route 513. The landscaped center strip is owned and maintained by Seattle's Department of Parks and Recreation.
File 8985: Full Text >

Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition in Seattle celebrates Japanese Navy Day on June 4, 1909.

On June 4, 1909, officers and cadets of the Japanese Navy cruisers Aso and Soya take part in Japanese Navy Day at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific (A-Y-P) Exposition. The exposition took place on the University of Washington campus in Seattle between June 1 and October 16, 1909. More than three million visitors came from around the state, the nation, and the world to view hundreds of exhibits, stroll the lushly manicured grounds, and be entertained on the Pay Streak midway, while Seattle promoted itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia. Each day of the A-Y-P (except Sundays) was designated as a Special Day for one or more groups. Special Days drew people involved in the featured organizations, and the resulting programs, lectures, ceremonies, parades, and athletic competitions gave local people a reason to visit again and again. On Japanese Navy Day, hundreds of Japanese sailors toured the A-Y-P grounds, their presence drawing crowds of local Japanese residents to the exposition. A 38-piece band of cadets gave a concert in the bandstand in Nome Circle, and Japanese Navy participation in the fair extended into the next day. The Japanese squadron stayed in Puget Sound harbors from May 24 to June 12, greeted by ships from the U.S. Pacific Fleet squadron and hosted by the Tacoma and Seattle chambers of commerce, state and local officials, and the local citizenry.
File 8680: Full Text >

< Show previous 20 | Show Next 20 >

Showing 1 - 1 of 1 results

The Exposition: A Contemporary Report on the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition by Mateel Howe (1909)

This is a contemporary report on the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific Exposition, Washington's first world's fair. The exposition took place between June 1 and October 16, 1909, drawing more than three million people. Visitors came from around the state, the nation, and the world to view hundreds of educational exhibits, stroll the lushly manicured grounds, and be entertained on the Pay Streak midway, while Seattle promoted itself as a gateway to the rich resources of Alaska, the Yukon, and Asia. Mateel Howe was sent to the exposition from her home in Portland to report on its opening week by the newspaper The Independent. This is a reprint of her report published as "The Exposition," The Independent, June 24, 1909, p. 1368
File 8892: Full Text >

< Show previous 20 | Show Next 20 >
 
Home About Us Contact Us Education Bookstore Tourism Advanced Search

HistoryLink.org is the first online encyclopedia of local and state history created expressly for the Internet. (SM)
HistoryLink.org is a free public and educational resource produced by History Ink, a 501 (c) (3) tax-exempt corporation.
Contact us by phone at 206.447.8140, by mail at Historylink, 1411 4th Ave. Suite 803, Seattle WA 98101 or email admin@historylink.org