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Topic: Northwest Indians

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Gold in the Pacific Northwest

The discovery of gold in California in 1848 sent would-be millionaires on a quest for treasure throughout the West. By 1900, major strikes had been made in Oregon, Idaho, Nevada, Alaska, and western C...

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Hansen, Cecile: Tribal Chairwoman of Seattle's Duwamish Peoples

Cecile Ann Hansen -- a descendant within the family of Chief Si 'ahl ("Chief Seattle") -- has served as the elected chair of her people since 1975. During those decades the Duwamish (or in the Salish ...

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Hilbert, Vi (1918-2008)

Vi Hilbert, a member of the Upper Skagit tribe, had as her life's work to preserve the Lushootseed (Puget Salish) language and culture. Vi learned Lushootseed (the language of Chief Seattle) as a chil...

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History Day award winner -- Far-Reaching Rights: An Era of Innovation in Treaty Law in Washington State that Impacted the Rights of Aboriginal Peoples Worldwide by Jacob Ziontz

Jacob Ziontz, was a tenth-grade student in teacher Mikael Christensen's class at Shorewood High School when he won the 2010 HistoryLink.org award, senior division, for this essay on the history of Pac...

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History Day award winner -- Neah Bay Whaling Conflict: Upholding a Compromise by Kendal Crawford

Kendal Crawford, a 14-year-old eighth-grade student at Canyon Park Junior High School in the Northshore district, won first place in the Junior Division, Historical Paper Category, of the 2008 North P...

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History Day award winner -- Trust in Treaties: How Tragedy Turned to Triumph for Puget Sound Native American Fishing Rights by Jacob Bruce

Jacob Bruce, a 12-year-old student in the 7th Grade at Kingston Junior High School, won second place in the 2007 History Day competition with this essay on Native American fishing rights.

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HistoryLink Elementary: Chief Seattle

Chief Seattle's parents were from tribes on both sides of Elliott Bay and the Duwamish River. He lived during a time of change for his people and the Puget Sound region. He welcomed the Collins and De...

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HistoryLink Elementary: Fort Walla Walla

Between 1818 and 1910, there were four outposts named Fort Walla Walla. The first Fort Walla Walla was established as a fur-trading post by the North West Company. The next two were built to house U.S...

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HistoryLink Elementary: Horses Change Life on the Columbia Plateau

Hundreds of years ago, the Native Americans who lived in Washington's Columbia Plateau region had no means of traveling on land other than walking. That all changed when local Indian groups began to a...

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HistoryLink Elementary: Kennewick Man

The skull and bones of a man who lived more than 9,000 years ago were discovered in 1996 near Kennewick, Washington. Archaeologists realized that these remains were very rare. Some wanted to have the ...

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HistoryLink Elementary: Legends from Washington State Tribes

For thousands of years, Native Americans preserved their history in a special way. They passed down their traditions and culture to the next generation by means of oral tradition -- or storytelling. A...

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HistoryLink Elementary: Makah Whaling

The culture and lifestyle of the Makah Indians is based on the sea. Their homeland is on the Olympic Peninsula in northwestern Washington, along the shore of the Strait of Juan de Fuca and the coastli...

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